Loading…
This event has ended. View the official site or create your own event → Check it out
This event has ended. Create your own
View analytic

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Tuesday, August 16
 

8:00am

ARIS Global Summit

The Annual ARIS Summit is an incredible time of connecting with other educators, researchers, and designers who are exploring location based games, storytelling and design.

Join us in Madison on August 16, 2016 right right before the Games+Learning+Society Conference. During the day you will see what’s been going on with ARIS this year. This is a relational day with lots of discussion around the use of mobile for storytelling, game design and field work. We look forward to seeing old friends and new.


For more information and registration, go to 
http://arisgames.org/aris-summit-2016/

Speakers
avatar for David Gagnon

David Gagnon

Director, Field Day Lab, University of Wisconsin - Madison
I have a sweet spot for directing small design teams to approach big challenges. I like thinking and making real world products that are inspired by all the cool stuff kids like these days. I love seeing other people find themselves by making something new. I also am a bit of a baking addict, still trying to nail the traditional sour dough baguette in a wood fired oven.


Tuesday August 16, 2016 8:00am - 6:30pm
Industry Union South

10:00am

Games for Impact Production and Design Workshop

Whether you are commissioning a game from a developer, or a developer working on a project for a client, or the market in general, this workshop provides an in-depth end-to-end look at how to build games for impact purposes.  This includes health, education, behavior change, and more.

The key to the workshop is that it focuses on general approaches to designing games, but spends much more time in-detail looking at two key issues facing many impact game projects:

1. What’s are the differences when making a game for impact vs. entertainment games.

2. What are the key responsibilities and need-to-knows when game projects involve those who have not built games before?  How can you optimize game development when it key members of the development and player sides of the equation are not everyday game developers or players?

Game for impact projects are different-by-design.  Drawing upon over a decade of experience advising, designing, and building projects across many different platforms, purposes, and audiences workshop leader Ben Sawyer will help both developers, and commissioners of such projects reach better outcomes.

10:00 am to 5:00 pm. $160.00 for this exclusive event includes lunch: register here 


Speakers
avatar for Ben Sawyer

Ben Sawyer

Co-Founder, Digitalmill
Games for Health



Tuesday August 16, 2016 10:00am - 5:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

11:30am

Early Career Workshop

The Inaugural Games + Learning + Society Early Career Workshop offers select early career scholars the opportunity for valuable career advice and critical feedback on their scholarship.

The purpose of the workshop is to nurture early career scholars in Games and Learning.  We endeavor to both widen the field and deepen research in the field as a new generation of scholars embarks on their careers. The workshop will provide mentorship, build networks, and through collegial support work to advance and propel the the study of Games and Learning.

The workshops will consist of several events including panels on publishing, small group mentor time with senior scholars, professional development planning activities, and a grant writing working group. They will also have the opportunity to build new peer relationships and potential collaborations with other early career scholars who are part of the workshop.

 APPLICATIONS ARE DUE ON MAY 27, 2016. Application details here.


Speakers
avatar for Crystle Martin

Crystle Martin

Researcher, University of California, Irvine


Tuesday August 16, 2016 11:30am - 5:30pm
Wisconsin Idea Union South
 
Wednesday, August 17
 

8:30am

Playful Learning Breakfast
Speakers
avatar for Seann Dikkers

Seann Dikkers

Education Department Chair, Bethel University
Seann Dikkers is an associate professor of Education at Bethel University. Formerly, Seann served fourteen years as a middle school teacher, high school principal, and researcher. Now he teaches, writes, and works with some amazing colleagues at Bethel. He studies exemplary teaching, learning design, and learning systems. His books include *Real-Time Research*, *Mobile Media Learning I and II*, and *TeacherCraft: Minecraft in the Classroom... Read More →


Wednesday August 17, 2016 8:30am - 9:30am
Varsity Hall Union South

9:00am

Breakfast
Menu may include:
Bottles of Assorted Juices
Rolled Ham and Turkey Slices, Sliced Cheeses with a warm roll
Hard Boiled Eggs
Whole Fresh Fruit
Assortment of Muffins
Assorted Health Bars and Granola Bars
Italian Roast Coffee, Decaf Coffee and Assorted Teas
Bottled Water, Milk and Soy Milk

Gluten free rolls available, please indicate your dietary restrictions on your registration form 

Wednesday August 17, 2016 9:00am - 10:00am
Varsity Hall Union South

10:00am

The Philosophical Roots of Computer Game Design
Speakers
avatar for Ernest Adams

Ernest Adams

Dr. Ernest W. Adams is a senior lecturer in the Department of Game Design at Uppsala University Campus Gotland in Sweden. He is also a game design consultant and author who has served in the video game industry since 1989. Ernest worked at Electronic Arts for 8 years as a programmer, lead designer, and producer,chiefly on the Madden NFLfootball series. He has developed online, computer, and console games for everything from the IBM 360... Read More →

Opening Words

Wednesday August 17, 2016 10:00am - 11:00am
Varsity Hall Union South

11:00am

Arcade & Games Tournament
Have some time to kill before the next talk? Come check out the GLS Arcade where we'll have all the newest gen consoles, complete with a huge stack of great games; a Dance and Jam games section to get you moving; a PC section for your Hearthstone or League of Legends fix; and (new to GLS) a Virtual Reality section including multiple Occulus DK2 and HTC Vive! Is there any better way to get to know your fellow game scholars, developers, and enthusiasts?

GLS is excited to announce the first ever Games Tournaments to be held  throughout the conference! Come test your game skills against other game scholars, developers, and enthusiasts! Prizes and glory await the winners! Stay tuned for details on the games you'll be playing and what you will walking away with when you prove victorious!

There are rolling high-scores for Guitar Hero, DDR, and Forza. People can play these at any time and have a volunteer record their highscore.

Bracket tournament games for Thursday evening: Smash Bros Brawl, Smash Bros WiiU, Mortal Kombat X, Splatoon, Halo, and Johan Sabastien Joust. These each have a sign up sheet that I will randomly place people into brackets from. Walk-ins welcome. 



Wednesday August 17, 2016 11:00am - 5:00pm
Northwoods Union South

11:30am

Learning about “Self” – Game + Design + Therapy
This Panel brings together game designers and therapists in order to explore the potential of playing as well as designing games for self-inquiry, reflection and therapeutic purposes. Games enable embodied experiences and have thus gained a reputation as powerful learning tools. They can teach us something about ourselves as well as what it’s like to walk in somebody else’s shoes, thus increasing empathy, understanding, and personal growth. Playful engagement with personal conflicts through games and their design can lead to new insights, opening up new perspectives, point towards opportunities for change, increase psychological agency and have transformational power. This Panel explores different purposes of and approaches to games and game design from therapeutic perspectives, including an inquiry of game design as a new modality within creative arts therapies.

Speakers
SH

Sabine Harrer

University of Vienna
SI

Susan Imus

Columbia College
LK

Leslie Kirby

Vanderbilt University
AM

Adam Mayes

Subject Responsible for Game Design, Uppsala University
HM

Heidi McDonald

Centerstone Research
avatar for Doris Rusch

Doris Rusch

Chicago, IL, USA, DePaul University
The human condition is extremely fascinating to me: what makes us tick? What's the spectrum of our emotions? How do we make sense of our experiences and share them with others? Games are a great medium to create shared experiences related to the human condition. One of my main areas of exploration related to that are mental health issues and the use of metaphors to make abstract ideas tangible. I made a few metaphorical games about addiction... Read More →


Wednesday August 17, 2016 11:30am - 12:30pm
Traditions Union South

11:30am

Makeology
We will be sharing an overview of our two-volume series, Makeology, just released by Routledge. In addition, we will share insights from our specific areas of expertise including - Computational Literacy; Crafting, sewing, and electronic textiles; Issues of gender in making; The role of online communication; Making as a movement.

Speakers
MB

Matthew Berland

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
DF

Deborah Fields

Research Consultant + Assistant Professor, Utah State University
Dr. Deborah A. Fields is a Temporary Assistant Professor in Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences at Utah State University and an independent research consultant. Deborah researches children’s connective learning and identity engagement through designing with digital technologies in ways that bridge informal and formal learning contexts. She is the co-PI on the Kids' DIY Media Project (kidsdiymedia.com) aimed at identifying and... Read More →
YK

Yasmin Kafai

University of Pennsylvania
Yasmin Kafai is Professor of Learning Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania. She is a researcher, designer, and developer of online communities and tools (ecrafting.org, stitchtfest.org, and scratch.mit.edu) to promote computational participation, crafting, and creativity across K-16. Book publications include Connected Code, Connected Play, The Computer Clubhouse, Textile Messages, and Beyond Barbie and Mortal Kombat. Kafai earned a... Read More →
MM

Mike McGalliard

Imagination Foundation


Wednesday August 17, 2016 11:30am - 12:30pm
Landmark Union South

11:30am

Try Again, Fail Better: Leveraging the Utility of Failure
As frustrating as failure may be, failing is an integral part of both playing and learning. As framed by Jesper Juul, failure is also a prime motivator for experiment and experience. How, though, can we best utilize that motivating quality of failure in disparate learning environments? This presentation seeks to interrogate failure as a form of progression, a forced consideration of strategy, process, and approach, and from different angles of analysis and praxis, attempts to share insights not on the art, but the utility, of failure.

Speakers
avatar for Tony  Bushner

Tony Bushner

Grad Student/TA, Purdue University
Games scholar, coder, obsessive collector/hoarder of board and video games. He also tries to make music with Gameboys.
PL

Patrick Love

Purdue University
AV

Ashley Velasquez

Purdue University


Wednesday August 17, 2016 11:30am - 12:30pm
Wisconsin Idea Union South

11:30am

Exploding the Castle: Seeking to Shape the Future of Games in Education
Lacking a digital crystal ball, we cannot predict the future of education or the precise instructional role games will have going forward. Yet, we can safely say that games will play some role in the future of K-12 and higher education, and members of the games community will have to choose between being passive observers or active contributors to the complex and often political process of weaving together pedagogy, technology, and culture. Our Panel of experts will address collective thinking with respect to the value-added nature of games for learning, environmental-player interaction, scalability, goal adoption, relationships between play and transfer, and the value of games as part of an ecopsychological worldview. As long-time contributors in a field that has made a habit of playing it safe—pun intended—we seek to bring the dialogue in a more nuanced and meaningful direction that will reach teachers, researchers, designers, and players alike.

Speakers
avatar for Anna Arici

Anna Arici

Tempe, Arizona, USA, Arizona State University
Anna is a learning scientist and Director of Quest2Teach, designing and researching 3D immersive learning environments for pre-service and in-service teachers. Anna has been researching and creating curriculum for games-based learning for the past dozen years within QuestAtlantis (3D RPG games for grades 4-8), and from there spawned Quest2Teach after realizing the need to bring educators into games and their pedagogies from their initial... Read More →
avatar for Sasha Barab

Sasha Barab

Tempe, Arizona, USA, Arizona State University
My work involves the seamless integration of bounded games (where players can fail safely, receive embedded assessment, and have consequentiality in the confines of a fictional world) and larger, flexible 'meta-game' structures and affinity spaces that foster user-driven extensions and adaptations in support of real-world goals ad outcomes.
avatar for Jackie  Barnes

Jackie Barnes

Boston, Massachusetts, USA, Northeastern University
I've spent my years in grad school designing educational games, and my dissertation years looking into the diversity of user experience in a specific educational games. I want to keep designing, and to better understand how players see games differently, and whether they see educational games as "school" or "a real game."
avatar for Elisabeth Gee

Elisabeth Gee

Tempe, Arizona, USA, Arizona State University
I'm the Associate Director of the Center for Games & Impact at ASU, and co-directing the Play2Connect initiative with Dr. Sinem Siyahhan at Cal State-San Marcos. I'm interested in gender and gaming, game-based affinity spaces, and intergenerational play.
MG

Melissa Gresalfi

Vanderbilt University
avatar for Trent Hergenrader

Trent Hergenrader

Rochester, NY, United States, Rochester Institute of Technology
My primary area of research is using games and gaming in English courses, and more specifically using role-playing games to teach fiction writing. I am an Assistant Professor at the Rochester Institute of Technology.
avatar for Jeffrey Brandon Holmes

Jeffrey Brandon Holmes

Tempe, Arizona, USA, Arizona State University
Jeff Holmes is a Founding Graduate Fellow at the Center for Games and Impact at Arizona State University, a PhD student in Rhetoric and Composition in the Department of English, and a life-long gamer. His research focuses on how games demonstrate good principles of teaching outside of school, how communities collectively construct identities, and how gaming and play extend to multiple sites beyond the traditional boundaries of 'gamespace.' In... Read More →
avatar for Stephen Slota

Stephen Slota

Co-Founder, The Pericles Group, LLC
Steve (@steveslota) is an instructional design specialist and game design scientist at the University of Connecticut Health Center and a co-founder of The Pericles Group, LLC. He holds a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology: Cognition, Instruction, & Learning Technologies and has worked on a variety of game and instructional design projects with organizations including Arizona State University's Center for Games & Impact, Intel Corporation, and... Read More →
avatar for Constance  Steinkuehler

Constance Steinkuehler

Chair, Games+Learning+Society Conference
Constance Steinkuehler is a Professor in Digital Media at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, Co-Director of the Games+Learning+Society (GLS) center at the Wisconsin Institute of Discovery, and Chair of their annual GLS Conference. She currently serves as President of the Higher Education Videogames Alliance (HEVGA), an organization of higher education leaders whose mission is to underscore the cultural, scientific, and economic... Read More →
avatar for Roger Travis

Roger Travis

Storrs, CT, US, University of Connecticut, and The Pericles Group, LLC
Only connect: ancient epic to video games; teacher to student; gamer to gamer; fan to fan; parent to child; human being to human being.
MY

Michael Young

CT, United States, University of Connecticut, Storrs


Wednesday August 17, 2016 11:30am - 12:30pm
Agriculture Union South

11:30am

Perceptual, Decision-Making, and Learning Processes During Video Gameplay - An Analysis of Infamous Second Son with the GRAD Framework
During video gameplay, gamers’ constantly perceive and interpret multimodal symbols presented by the game, which influences their decision-making and learning processes that help them achieve goals and progress during gameplay. Furthermore, the gamers’ decisions (e.g., which paths, weapons, and power-ups they choose) influence how the game unfolds and responds through presenting new multimodal feedback. So, as video gameplay is an iterative process of interpreting multimodal symbols, making decisions, and learning, it is important to recognize how multimodal communication impacts the gamer’s decisions and learning. This paper uses the Gamer Response and Decision (GRAD) Framework (Author, under review), which highlights important video gameplay features and processes, to analyze multimodal symbols presented during gameplay in Infamous - Second Son, an action-adventure game for the PlayStation 4. Additionally, this paper examines how these symbols carry meaning to gamers that influence their decisions, learning, and progression during gameplay.

Speakers
SV

Sam von Gillern

Ames, Iowa, USA, Iowa State University


Wednesday August 17, 2016 11:30am - 12:30pm
Marquee Union South

11:30am

Designing Design Research for Game Development
Design research can fuel innovation, shape approaches, and ensure efficacy. In game development, design research is a means of getting away from common sense assumptions and moving an accurate understanding of player interests, motivations, and concerns. This workshop provides a brief overview of design research approaches. Participants will work in groups to develop design research strategies for their own planned or prospective projects. While we are interested in the benefits and advantages of design research for game development, the focus here is on practical aspects of integrating design research into game development, including the selection and execution of appropriate research methods, how design research can affect game production schedules, and associated costs.

Speakers
CK

Carly Kocurek

Illinois Institute of Technology
JM

Jennifer Miller

Assistant Professor, Illinois Institute of Technology


Wednesday August 17, 2016 11:30am - 12:30pm
Industry Union South

12:30pm

Lunch
Vegetarian and Gluten free options will be available

Wednesday August 17, 2016 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Pavillion

12:45pm

Doctoral Student Lunch
Calling advanced doctoral students! Trying to figure out the job market? What to do *after* you graduate? Want to talk with some scholars and professionals who have taken different trajectories in recent years? Come to our special mentorship lunch, hosted by Deborah Fields and some special colleagues. We’ll eat and chat about possibilities, challenges, and practicalities of pursing careers after graduation. Reserve your seat on the ‘Additional Options’ page when you register.

Speakers
avatar for Benjamin DeVane

Benjamin DeVane

Iowa City, Iowa, United States, University of Iowa
Identity & Learning | Computational Thinking | Design & Aesthetics
DF

Deborah Fields

Research Consultant + Assistant Professor, Utah State University
Dr. Deborah A. Fields is a Temporary Assistant Professor in Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences at Utah State University and an independent research consultant. Deborah researches children’s connective learning and identity engagement through designing with digital technologies in ways that bridge informal and formal learning contexts. She is the co-PI on the Kids' DIY Media Project (kidsdiymedia.com) aimed at identifying and... Read More →
AM

Alecia Magnifico

Assistant professor, University of New Hampshire
avatar for David Simkins

David Simkins

Assistant Professor, Rochester Institute of Technology
David is fascinated by the potential of games, particularly role playing as a tool for facilitating and encouraging learning. He is also fascinated by the constraints and affordances of different games as tools for learning. Fortunately, he is ale to study games, write about games, teach about games, and make games for non-commercial purposes without starving. He is an assistant professor at RIT's School of Interactive Games and Media, and a... Read More →
avatar for Sinem Siyahhan

Sinem Siyahhan

Sinem Siyahhan is an Assistant Professor of Educational Technology and Learning Sciences at California State University, and the Founding Director of Play2Connect, an initiative that aims to support family learning, communication, and connection through gaming. Her scholarship uses design-based research to understand the affordances of digital media technologies, in particular video games, for human-computer interaction, teaching, learning, and... Read More →


Wednesday August 17, 2016 12:45pm - 1:45pm
Varsity Hall Union South

2:00pm

Diversifying Barbie and Mortal Kombat: Addressing Gender and Race in Critical Educational Practice, Inclusive Conference Design, and Intersectional Research on Gaming
One of the pressing issues in gaming has been the lack of diversity. Recent events that highlight continued harassment and negative stereotypes against women and non-dominant groups have highlighted that this issue is still alive and kicking. In this Panel, we not only want to discuss these issues but also move forward with proposals on how to address them in design, research and practice. Panelists will present work on how to set up research labs that invite critical discussions, how to design public conferences that are inclusive in participation, and how to conduct research that examines how gaming communities can foster inclusivity. We will furthermore discuss implications from these experiences for serious gaming.

Speakers
KG

Kishonna Gray

Eastern Kentucky University
YK

Yasmin Kafai

University of Pennsylvania
Yasmin Kafai is Professor of Learning Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania. She is a researcher, designer, and developer of online communities and tools (ecrafting.org, stitchtfest.org, and scratch.mit.edu) to promote computational participation, crafting, and creativity across K-16. Book publications include Connected Code, Connected Play, The Computer Clubhouse, Textile Messages, and Beyond Barbie and Mortal Kombat. Kafai earned a... Read More →
GR

Gabriela Riachard

University Park, Pennsylvania, United States, Pennsylvania State University
avatar for Sarah  Schoemann

Sarah Schoemann

Georgia Institute of Technology
Sarah Schoemann is the founder of Different Games Conference and a doctoral student in Digital Media at Georgia Tech. As a researcher, game designer and educational technologist, her work investigates the implications of accessible media and technology tools as vehicles for personal expression and social critique within communities of practice, considering the ways they are in conversation with broader issues of equity and social justice, both... Read More →


Wednesday August 17, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Traditions Union South

2:00pm

Gamified Cultural Transformation: In the Classroom and Beyond
In the recent rush to adopt game based solutions, some companies have produced function focused games that emphasis game elements rather than lasting outcomes. Serious games that are the most success are human focused. They are designed from the outset to address users’ needs and motivations and provide the user with more than just an entertaining experience. By blending solid game design with well-established andragogy/pedagogy, truly effectives games are can create lasting changes in business, government, and healthcare and beyond. This Panel will bring together a variety of experts from professional fields to discuss how the use of analytics, cognitive feedback, and human focused design can shape the future of serious gaming. Panelists will share their experiences, and challenges, implementing games in a variety of settings, and explore the future of games in business and beyond.

Speakers
YC

Yu-Kai Chou

COO & Head of Product, RewardMe
Yu-Kai won the Gamification World Award (twice) and also gave a TED talk in 2014 about Gamification.
avatar for Jerry  Fuqua

Jerry Fuqua

Operations Director, The Octalysis Group
Jerry is currently the Operations Director at The Octalysis Group, which combines research in Game Design, Motivational Psychology, and Behavioral Economics to drive engagement ROIs for clients. He has worked extensively with technology-based industries and government organizations to help develop and foster successful corporate strategies, including game based solutions. | | Prior to his involvement with gamification, Jerry was an... Read More →
avatar for Andrew  Posselt

Andrew Posselt

Training Instructor, Virtual Learning Developer, Dean Clinic


Wednesday August 17, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Wisconsin Idea Union South

2:00pm

GAME NARRATIVES
When You Play the Game of Thrones… Everyone Wins!: Fanfiction and Role-Playing Games for Fiction Writers
Hergenrader

Fiction writing classes at the college level are often taught under the assumption that students should be learning to reproduce traditional literary works for print publication. This approach ignores the fact that many undergraduate students do not share this goal and instead take these classes to experiment with their own creative expression. Rather than focusing on print-based literary fiction, this paper argues that students can become more engaged and learn more deeply about narrative concepts and think critically about cultures and characters when they are writing stories in a preexisting world rather than trying to generate their own original settings. The familiarity of preexisting worlds combined with rules of role-playing games helps them feel at ease in the fiction writing classroom, increases engagement, and builds a strong writing community. This approach also allows them greater range to explore multimedia compositions and collaborative storytelling techniques.

Children's conceptions of stories in educational games
Jimenez

The GLS community at large have extolled on the necessity that a story/fantasy has in its relation to educational games. This study is a report on interviews done with 16 children after playing two educational games that were deemed to have high and low amounts of stories by the author and story grammar frameworks found in the research literature. The findings and interviews with the children tend to suggest that characters are of principal importance to children and that game mechanics can be leveraged by children to drive a story when none is present.

Thinking like Writers and Critics: How Adolescent Boys Experience Narrative-Driven Games
Hein, Engerman, Turcotte, Macaluso, Giri

Boys’ interests, values, and motivations are increasingly at odds with those of traditional classrooms. Video games, which have become an integral part of boy culture (Watkins, 2009), have the capacity to cultivate and develop literacy skills (Steinkuehler, 2010). This qualitative study thus investigates how adolescent boys play and learn within commercial-off-the-shelf game spaces. In particular, this paper reports on the study’s third phase and focuses on how narrative-driven games provide boys with safe platforms to think about and discuss literary moments. Findings suggest that players naturally analyze and critique the games’ narrative structures both during and after regular gameplay.


Discussants
avatar for Jayne C. Lammers

Jayne C. Lammers

Assistant professor, University of Rochester
affinity space research; online research methods; videogame and other digital literacies; writing; 21st century learning; adolescent literacies; English teacher preparation

Speakers
JE

Jason Engerman

State College, PA, USA, The Pennsylvania State University
SG

Sagun Giri

The Pennsylvania State University
avatar for Robert  Hein

Robert Hein

State College, PA, USA, The Pennsylvania State University
avatar for Trent Hergenrader

Trent Hergenrader

Rochester, NY, United States, Rochester Institute of Technology
My primary area of research is using games and gaming in English courses, and more specifically using role-playing games to teach fiction writing. I am an Assistant Professor at the Rochester Institute of Technology.
OJ

Osvaldo Jimenez

University of the Pacific
AM

Adam Macaluso

The Pennsylvania State University
NT

Nathan Turcotte

The Pennsylvania State University


Wednesday August 17, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Agriculture Union South

2:00pm

Language, History and Place

Landscape Analysis of Second Language Learning Games

Abstract: Games have the opportunity to provide language learners rich multimodal environments that ground language learning in a situated context. There are now a wide variety of second language learning games in a number of languages for different audiences. In this paper, we examine 68 games across different platforms to evaluate their approaches to pedagogy, proficiency, assessment, skills developed, and complexity. We describe our data collection and analysis procedures and then summarize the major trends in these areas. We found that most games take a didactic pedagogical approach, are targeted toward novices, incorporate assessment systems, focus on vocabulary development, and that average internal rating did not increase with the complexity of the learning within the game. The goal of this analysis is to inform and contextualize future potential efforts in this particular domain.

New Design Principles for Mobile History
Owen Gottlieb

This study draws on design-based research on an ARIS – based mobile augmented reality game for teaching early 20th century history. New design principles derived from the study include the use of supra-reveals, and bias mirroring. Supra-reveals are a kind of foreshadowing event in order to ground historical happenings in the wider enduring historical understanding. Bias mirroring refers to a non-player character echoing back a player’s biased behavior, in order to open the player to listening to alternative perspectives. Supra-reveals engendered discussion of historical themes early in the game experience. The results showed that use of a cluster of NPC bias mirroring techniques enhanced student ability to articulate points of view previously unavailable to them.

[Game]: The Death and Life of an AR game curriculum
Holden, Sykes, Thorne

Back in 2009, two of the authors began work on [Game], a design-based research project and game-based curriculum. Several years later, Mentira is gone. In many ways, we would say the project has failed. Looking back, it turns out that success and failure of design-based research (DBR) projects are not as simple as they seem. The metrics and mechanisms of academics do not represent much of the multifaceted lives and deaths of DBR projects. In particular, without work outside academia, it is doubtful that any such project can go from idiosyncratic experiment to meaningful effect on education. In this article, we revisit some of what went wrong in our project and where the silver linings are. We look at why [Game] died and what lives on in its place, with advice for other DBRtists, practitioners, and scholars of educational technology.

Discussants
Speakers
AG

Ardeshir Geranpayeh

Cambridge University
SG

Sam Graue-Landis

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
avatar for Chris Holden

Chris Holden

Associate Professor, University of New Mexico
Christopher Holden is an Associate Professor at the Honors College of the University of New Mexico. His PhD is in number theory, but his current research focuses on place based game design for learning. He has been doing this since 2006, originally using MIT’s Outdoor AR Engine. He was the first outside user of ARIS; in 2009 he and Julie Sykes produced and used Mentira, a murder mystery for Spanish language students at UNM. Shortly... Read More →
AJ

Anna Jordan-Douglass

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
AL

Anna Lloyd

Cambridge University
AN

Andrew Nye

Cambridge University
PS

Primproud Sarasin

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
avatar for Jenny Saucerman

Jenny Saucerman

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
avatar for Constance  Steinkuehler

Constance Steinkuehler

Chair, Games+Learning+Society Conference
Constance Steinkuehler is a Professor in Digital Media at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, Co-Director of the Games+Learning+Society (GLS) center at the Wisconsin Institute of Discovery, and Chair of their annual GLS Conference. She currently serves as President of the Higher Education Videogames Alliance (HEVGA), an organization of higher education leaders whose mission is to underscore the cultural, scientific, and economic... Read More →
avatar for Julie Sykes

Julie Sykes

Director / Courtesy Assistant Professor, Center for Applied Second Language Studies, University of Oregon
ST

Steven Thorne

Portland State University


Wednesday August 17, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Landmark Union South

2:00pm

Designing Games with Assessment in Mind: Diverse Processes of Integrating Design Thinking with Evidence-Centered Design
Each year many papers are presented at GLS discussing the role of assessment in game design and the methods by which different games intend to support and measure educationally valuable knowledge and skills. While many of them claim to use ECD, it is often unclear how they leverage assessment to conceptualize game design around the competency of interest. This Symposium aims to discuss and synthesize different processes and methods beyond ECD that are currently being applied by different groups.

Speakers
avatar for Jodi Asbell-Clarke

Jodi Asbell-Clarke

Director, TERC
I direct a team of game designers, researchers, and learning scientists who live and work on the edge of science and play.
avatar for David Gagnon

David Gagnon

Director, Field Day Lab, University of Wisconsin - Madison
I have a sweet spot for directing small design teams to approach big challenges. I like thinking and making real world products that are inspired by all the cool stuff kids like these days. I love seeing other people find themselves by making something new. I also am a bit of a baking addict, still trying to nail the traditional sour dough baguette in a wood fired oven.
avatar for James Paul Gee

James Paul Gee

Tempe, Arizona, USA, Arizona State University
EH

Elizabeth Huttner-Loan

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
YJ

Yoon Jeon Kim

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
avatar for Kevin  Miklasz

Kevin Miklasz

New York, NY, United States, BrainPOP
I work on games, data, assessment, learner-centered education, and science.
avatar for Michelle  Riconscente

Michelle Riconscente

President, Designs for Learning


Wednesday August 17, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Fifth Quarter Studio Union South

2:00pm

Soteria – Teaching Strategies to Overcome Anxiety
Soteria – Dreams as Currency (SDC) is a metaphorical, single-player, 3D adventure game intended to promote players’ readiness to use psycho-therapeutically proven yet counter-intuitive strategies to overcome general anxiety disorder. It is based on the research of Anxiety Treatment Center founder Prof. Reid Wilson and serves to communicate principles of anxiety treatment in a way that enables embodied learning and experiential understanding. The design leverages a “recursive learning” approach (Mitgutsch & Weise 2011) that subverts player expectations and promotes the insight that to overcome fear, one must “move towards it”. This presentation is an in-depth analysis of how we harnessed rules, mechanics, narrative, and metaphor to model anxiety behavior, dismantle it as unproductive and then introduce new, productive strategies to respond to fear in order to claim one’s dreams and live a full life.

Speakers
avatar for Doris Rusch

Doris Rusch

Chicago, IL, USA, DePaul University
The human condition is extremely fascinating to me: what makes us tick? What's the spectrum of our emotions? How do we make sense of our experiences and share them with others? Games are a great medium to create shared experiences related to the human condition. One of my main areas of exploration related to that are mental health issues and the use of metaphors to make abstract ideas tangible. I made a few metaphorical games about addiction... Read More →


Wednesday August 17, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Marquee Union South

2:00pm

Using Games to Teach Computer Science Concepts
Games that help players develop an understanding of computer science concepts are a promising alternative to the current emphasis on programming. This workshop will introduce participants to digital and analog games that demonstrate how CS concepts can be integrated with game play and engaging story contexts. Relevant issues such as the use of player data for assessment of learning, the role of narrative in educational games, and the challenges of identifying appropriate concepts for game-based learning will also be addressed. \

Speakers
avatar for Earl  Aguilera

Earl Aguilera

Graduate Research Assistant, Center for Games and Impact, ASU
literacy development in a digital age | the distributed nature of teaching and learning | game experiences as literacy events | re-designing schools for the 21st century | teacher education | high school teaching stories | coffee nerdery of all sorts | dungeons | dragons
avatar for Jackie  Barnes

Jackie Barnes

Boston, Massachusetts, USA, Northeastern University
I've spent my years in grad school designing educational games, and my dissertation years looking into the diversity of user experience in a specific educational games. I want to keep designing, and to better understand how players see games differently, and whether they see educational games as "school" or "a real game."
SE

Stephanie Eordanidis

Kean University
YF

Yetunde Folajimi

Boston, Massachusetts, USA, Northeastern University
avatar for Elisabeth Gee

Elisabeth Gee

Tempe, Arizona, USA, Arizona State University
I'm the Associate Director of the Center for Games & Impact at ASU, and co-directing the Play2Connect initiative with Dr. Sinem Siyahhan at Cal State-San Marcos. I'm interested in gender and gaming, game-based affinity spaces, and intergenerational play.
avatar for Casper Harteveld

Casper Harteveld

Boston, Massachusetts, USA, Northeastern University
Dr. Casper Harteveld is an Assistant Professor of Game Design at Northeastern University, and author of Triadic Game Design (Springer, 2011), a book about serious game design. He earned his PhD degree from Delft University of Technology in Systems Engineering, Policy Analysis & Management. His research focuses on using games to learn about decision-making, and educating people in making better decisions through games. He applies this especially... Read More →
avatar for Gillian  Smith

Gillian Smith

Boston, Massachusetts, USA, Northeastern University
craft games | sewing | procedural content generation | computational creativity | feminism and games
CS

Carolee Stewart

Union, NJ, Kean University
avatar for Kelly Tran

Kelly Tran

Tempe, Arizona, USA, Arizona State University
PhD Student at Arizona State University.


Wednesday August 17, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Industry Union South

3:30pm

Designing Educational Games For Early Learners: Competing and Complementary Perspectives of Developers, Researchers, and Learning Experts
This Panel includes experts in digital game development, research, child development, and the learning sciences. Together they represent the various stakeholders in the development of games to support and promote learning in early childhood. They will discuss and debate their unique perspectives with respect to the goals and design of educational games as well as the ways their perspectives work in combination and in opposition to each other. For example, game developers often prioritize engagement and the fun features of a game that make children want to continue playing, while a researcher might prioritize the ways we know that young children use technology and the features that are associated with learning outcomes, and a child development expert might highlight the need for developmental appropriateness in content and usability. Thus, they all want the game to motivate and engage, but the way and extent to which learning is prioritized might differ.

Speakers
NH

Naomi Hupert

Education Development Center
CS

Camellia Sanford

Rockman et al
PV

Phil Vahey

SRI International


Wednesday August 17, 2016 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Traditions Union South

3:30pm

Including Gaming to Promote Inclusion
Any gathering to shape the field of games for learning would be incomplete without a dialogue about inclusion. A critical opportunity presents itself to the interdisciplinary stakeholders at GLS 12: to discuss ways to promote diversity by amplifying marginalized voices. Telling underrepresented stories helps society rise above the single narratives that dominate the mainstream. As Nigerian novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (2009) points out, “The consequence of a single story is this: It robs people of their dignity.” Fortunately, games are a powerful storytelling tool. When combined with digital media to create a problem space, games can promote inclusion while exercising players’ critical-thinking skills. Through a Panel featuring three projects in development at MNHS, we propose a dialogue addressing this question: How can organizations leverage gaming to promote inclusion, and how can institutions include gaming in pedagogy?

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Gillette

Rebecca Gillette

Digital Learning Specialist, Minnesota Historical Society
Rebecca Gillette, Digital Learning Specialist, has lead a number of digital projects at the Minnesota Historical Society over the past 5 years. She has created 2 place based mobile tours - the Minnesota State Fair & Minnesota River Byway mobile tours. Working with ARIS game developers, she has been a project team member of Play the Past since its inception with a specific focus on the classroom experience. She is currently the project lead for... Read More →
avatar for Suzi Hunn

Suzi Hunn

Teacher Education Specialist, Minnesota Historical Society
I'm in my 15th year at MNHS, where I served as project coordinator of the Revised Second Ed. of Northern Lights, the sixth-grade curriculum for Minnesota Studies used by 70,000 students. I consider myself a professional appreciator of K-12 teachers and have served them as a curriculum developer, workshop facilitator, and one-woman education-services sales team.
avatar for Jack  Matheson

Jack Matheson

Saint Paul, MN, United States, Minnesota Historical Society
Jack Matheson has enjoyed the opportunity to develop and deliver a wide variety of educational programming for the Minnesota Historical Society. At the Minnesota History Center, Jack develops and teaches classes, portrays a 19th Century fur trader for the History Player outreach program, and leads Historic Pub-Crawls through Downtown St. Paul. As Program Associate, Jack has had great fun developing and delivering History Live! (Interactive... Read More →


Wednesday August 17, 2016 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Wisconsin Idea Union South

3:30pm

EMPATHY & CULTURAL PERSPECTIVITY
How Do Presence, Flow, and Identification Affect Players’ Empathy and interest in Learning from a Serious Computer Game? 
Bachen, Hernandez-Ramos, Raphael, & Waldron

This study develops and tests an integrated model of how several psychological aspects of serious game play contribute to interest in learning and empathy with people from other cultures. Data are drawn from a study of U.S. college students’ experience of playing one of two roles (an American journalist or Haitian survivor) in Inside the Haiti Earthquake, a simulation game that allows players to experience the aftermath of a recent disaster in a foreign land. Our results suggest that serious game designers should prioritize inducing empathy and immersive presence in players, giving secondary attention to designing for flow and character identification. To overcome barriers to empathy, educators should supplement games that challenge students to play characters from distant cultures and social backgrounds with additional lesson planning and instructional materials.

Culture-narration games: a definition and pilot study
Gestwicki, Rittichier, DeArmond

We are inspired by the educational potential of the board game "Tales of the Arabian Nights," a popular game based on the eponymous folk tale. Considering this game and others like it, we identify the characteristics that define a genre of culture-narration games, which we consider to have untapped potential for educational and transformative games. We describe a design experiment through which a multidisciplinary team followed an iterative and incremental process, in collaboration with a community partner, to investigate the potential of this genre. The result is a game that uses a theme of monsters from around the world to teach cultural empathy. This pilot project reveals both the promise and several complications with the genre, which lead to recommendations for future work.


A Cross-Cultural Evaluation of a Computer Science Teaching Game
Folajim, Horn, Hoover, Barnes, Smith, Harteveld

The use of games for education has attracted a lot of attention in developed nations worldwide, and is gradually penetrating the developing world. Despite that there are educational and efficiency benefits from the cross-cultural implementation of educational games, most educational games are not designed for cross-cultural usage. This paper seeks to contribute to designing cross-culturally relevant educational games, and examine this in the particular context of computer science (CS) education through a CS teaching game for middle school students. We implemented this game in the USA and Nigeria in order to find what cross-cultural differences may need attention for future work. Results highlight that both populations find the game enjoyable yet challenging. However, a clear difference is noticeable in the learning outcomes, which may have been a result of the game’s design and the evaluation instruments. Therefore, a cross-cultural perspective is needed to both educational game design and its evaluation.

Discussants
avatar for Constance  Steinkuehler

Constance Steinkuehler

Chair, Games+Learning+Society Conference
Constance Steinkuehler is a Professor in Digital Media at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, Co-Director of the Games+Learning+Society (GLS) center at the Wisconsin Institute of Discovery, and Chair of their annual GLS Conference. She currently serves as President of the Higher Education Videogames Alliance (HEVGA), an organization of higher education leaders whose mission is to underscore the cultural, scientific, and economic... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Christine  Bachen

Christine Bachen

Associate Professor, Communication, Santa Clara University
Games and civic engagement, serious games that promote empathy, games for learning. | Best place for rhubarb pie in Madison?
avatar for Jackie  Barnes

Jackie Barnes

Boston, Massachusetts, USA, Northeastern University
I've spent my years in grad school designing educational games, and my dissertation years looking into the diversity of user experience in a specific educational games. I want to keep designing, and to better understand how players see games differently, and whether they see educational games as "school" or "a real game."
AD

Austin DeArmond

Ball State University
YF

Yetunde Folajimi

Boston, Massachusetts, USA, Northeastern University
avatar for Paul Gestwicki

Paul Gestwicki

Associate Professor, Ball State University
I am in the Computer Science department, where I teach advanced programming as well as game design and development. I regularly form multidiscplinary teams of undergraduates to work with community partners on serious game projects.
avatar for Casper Harteveld

Casper Harteveld

Boston, Massachusetts, USA, Northeastern University
Dr. Casper Harteveld is an Assistant Professor of Game Design at Northeastern University, and author of Triadic Game Design (Springer, 2011), a book about serious game design. He earned his PhD degree from Delft University of Technology in Systems Engineering, Policy Analysis & Management. His research focuses on using games to learn about decision-making, and educating people in making better decisions through games. He applies this especially... Read More →
avatar for Pedro  Hernandez-Ramos

Pedro Hernandez-Ramos

Santa Clara University
AH

Amy Hoover

Boston, Massachusetts, USA, Northeastern University
BH

Britton Horn

Boston, Massachusetts, USA, Northeastern University
avatar for Chad  Raphael

Chad Raphael

Professor, Santa Clara University
Chad Raphael is a scholar of political communication, including games for civic education and engagement, public deliberation, and journalism. He is interested in meeting and learning from anyone who shares an interest in how games can contribute to civic learning, discussion, and action.
KR

Kaley Rittichier

Ball State University
avatar for Gillian  Smith

Gillian Smith

Boston, Massachusetts, USA, Northeastern University
craft games | sewing | procedural content generation | computational creativity | feminism and games
AW

Amanda Waldron

Brookings Institution


Wednesday August 17, 2016 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Agriculture Union South

3:30pm

WOMEN, CODE, & GAMES
Rule the Roost: Designing a Game That Builds STEM Identity for Girls
Beukema

A strong STEM identity is crucial to both choosing and persisting through STEM careers. This is especially true for women and young girls, who face additional barriers. SciGirls is a transmedia initiative that addresses these barriers by engaging tween girls with STEM experiences and changing their perceptions of STEM careers. Rule the Roost is an online game that promotes the development of a strong, positive STEM identity through the integration of SciGirls gender equitable strategies, citizen science, and creative game design. Elements of alternate reality gaming and self-directed learning engage players in completing real world projects that develop STEM and 21st century skills. These skills, connected to game skills and experience points, are reflected as part of an online profile defining the player’s STEM identity, which can ultimately transfer to her personal identity.

More Than Making Games: Exploring the Professional Pathways of Women in the Game Industry
Ochsner

Many educators, researchers, and industry stakeholders share the common goals of fostering inclusivity in game communities and seeking ways to support young women in games and technology. This paper reports findings of a qualitative research study investigating the learning pathways, experiences, and expectations of women who work in the game industry. Interview data reveals that women in games share a common interest in making game communities and workspaces better for the next generation of game designers. Overall, participants’ contributions to these efforts fall into four primary roles: educators, advocates, role models, and leaders. Findings from this study begin to describe how game industry professionals understand their personal and professional pathways, and reveal how participants approach solutions for common barriers. This work hints at a number of possible research directions for researchers and educators looking to design better programs, curricula, and interventions that support young women along their learning pathways.

Understanding the Gap: Gender Similarities and Differences in Persistence and Self-Efficacy in a Coding Game
Lee, Malkiewich, & Slater

Traditional research on gender differences in learning and motivation yield a rich outline of how self-efficacy, persistence behaviors, and learning outcomes differ between boys and girls. These differences are especially prominent in male-dominated STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) subjects, where girls are less interested and engaged despite negligible gender differences in actual performance. These gender disparities in interest and motivation have been echoed in previous research on game preferences, but are quickly transforming as girls take greater interest in and play more games. This paper investigates affective and behavioral differences between gender when learning to code in a game. Results indicated that girls and boys do not differ in their coding self-efficacy, but girls are more resilient and persist longer in the face of failure. Our analyses provide implications for how future research may disentangle the interactions between self-efficacy in coding and games, failure, persistence, and gender role beliefs.

Discussants
avatar for Elisabeth Gee

Elisabeth Gee

Tempe, Arizona, USA, Arizona State University
I'm the Associate Director of the Center for Games & Impact at ASU, and co-directing the Play2Connect initiative with Dr. Sinem Siyahhan at Cal State-San Marcos. I'm interested in gender and gaming, game-based affinity spaces, and intergenerational play.

Speakers
avatar for Laura Beukema

Laura Beukema

Game Designer, Twin Cities PBS
AL

Alison Lee

New York, NY, United States, Classroom, Inc.
LM

Laura Malkiewich

New York, NY, United States, Teachers College Columbia University
avatar for Amanda Ochsner

Amanda Ochsner

Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Southern California
SS

Stefan Slater

New York, NY, United States, Teachers College Columbia University


Wednesday August 17, 2016 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Landmark Union South

3:30pm

LEARNING GEOSCIENCE CONCEPTS THROUGH PLAY & KINESTHETIC TRACKING
We sought to understand how embodied learning, simulations, and game mechanics could be utilized to teach challenging 6th to 9th grade geoscience topics. We therefore explored how sound, music, kinesthetic learning, and storytelling could become effective features of the GeoScience games we were developing. Narrative structure, explicit goals and rules, consistent indications of progress,intuitive ramping structures (progression of difficulty) and elegant scaffolding systems (building upon learned content) were all to play a role in the creation of a natural progression of understanding for each geological system and related phenomenon. In kinesthetic learning, movement and action replaced more passive forms of learning. The project was developed by the GameDesk Institute, in partnership with Bill Nye the Science Guy, LucasArts, The National Academies of Science, and Cal-Tech, and was supported by The National Science Foundation, The Science and Entertainment Exchange, and The Betty Moore Foundation. \

Speakers
avatar for Michelle  Riconscente

Michelle Riconscente

President, Designs for Learning
avatar for Lucien Vattel

Lucien Vattel

CEO, GameDesk
Trailblazing education and game development visionary Lucien Vattel is at the forefront of a nationwide crusade to revolutionize learning in the classroom and beyond. As the CEO of the Los Angeles-based interactive curriculum creator and digital publisher GameDesk, Vattel is transforming the traditional school model into a hands-on, digitally-charged ecosystem for students to discover and nourish their greatest gifts, while embracing STEM... Read More →


Wednesday August 17, 2016 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Fifth Quarter Studio Union South

3:30pm

Just Give Me the Controller: Scaffolded Learning, World-Building, and The Witness
Jonathan Blow’s 2016 game The Witness is aptly named for both the game narrative and the type of play it encourages. This Well Played session investigates The Witness for it’s unique methods of scaffolded learning, world-building and narrative development, and the unique way it encourages couch co-op play despite being a single player game.

Speakers
AL

Alex Layne

St. Paul, Minnesota, United States, Metropolitan State University
CR

Cody Reimer

Menomonie, Wisconsin, United States, University of Wisconsin-Stout


Wednesday August 17, 2016 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Marquee Union South

3:30pm

Visualizing Game Data: Collaborative Dashboard Design for Researchers and Teachers by Researchers and Teachers
Digital games have become one of the more popular learning mediums, both in and out of the classroom (Prensky, 2003). While they provide engaging and diverse learning experiences, it is still unclear how to properly assess student learning in these massively complex environments. Furthermore, the integration of these programs into existing teacher curricula requires a large amount of resources and development centered on how to provide concise professional development materials and meaningful data visualizations for the increasingly busy K-12 teacher (Work, M.D.). The ADAGE system aims to collect real-time telemetry data from games and present it to teachers and researchers in a way that can provide quick assessment of student learning (Stenerson, Salmon, Berland, & Squire, 2014). In this workshop, attendees will interact with three different educational games and asked to collaboratively design a mock-up of an interface that they would use to assess learning in their professional lives.

Speakers
avatar for Mark  Stenerson

Mark Stenerson

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
avatar for Aybuke  Gul Turker

Aybuke Gul Turker

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison


Wednesday August 17, 2016 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Industry Union South

4:30pm

Poster Session Set up
Our evening poster session will have free standing boards with 3.8' by 3.8' available surface. Pins will be provided, but you are invited to bring something else if you wish. If you require anything else (table, power) please contact the poster session curator. The poster session will be held in the Varsity Hall, with setup beginning Wednesday evening at 4:30 pm, the session officially starting at 5:00 pm, and running till 7:00 pm. Heavy hors d'oeuvres will be served with small tables scattered throughout. Poster storage is available in registration before and after the session. We can also receive shipments; contact the poster curator for details. Your poster curator this year is Karin Spader, who can be reached at kspader@wisc.edu. This year we will have poster awards sponsored by DeVry! The nationally prominent judges will visit each poster and talk to you during the poster session, with awards presented at the Showcase ceremony on Wednesday night. 

Speakers

Wednesday August 17, 2016 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

Poster Session Hors d'Oeuvres
Beer and Heavy Hors d'Oeuvres with vegetarian and gluten free options

Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

Beyond the Campus Walking Tour: An ARIS Augmented Learning Expedition
We present an in-progress project for an Augmented Reality Game for high school students visiting a university campus. The purpose of this game is to create an engaging experience for visiting high school students to learn about culture of the university, to involve them as members in the university as a community of practice, and to help students make connections to the university through CrossActionSpaces. We discuss combining the augmented reality features of ARIS gaming platform with the Meaningful Learning with technology framework to achieve this goal.

Speakers
SB

Shannon Bossaller

Columbia, Missouri, United States of America, University of Missouri
avatar for Fatih Demir

Fatih Demir

Columbia, Missouri, United States of America, University of Missouri
JG

Joseph Griffin

University of Missouri
HH

Hao He

Columbia, Missouri, United States of America, University of Missouri
avatar for Isa  Jahnke

Isa Jahnke

associate professor, information science and learning technologies, University of Missouri
avatar for So Mi Kim

So Mi Kim

Columbia, Missouri, United States of America, University of Missouri
avatar for Michele Kroll

Michele Kroll

Columbia, Missouri, United States of America, University of Missouri
Education Technology | Mobile Learning | Augmented Reality | Web 2.0 Applications | Active and Meaningful learning experiences using technology
NM

Nilay Muslu

Columbia, Missouri, United States of America, University of Missouri
avatar for Sara  Ringbauer

Sara Ringbauer

Columbia, Missouri, United States of America, University of Missouri
*Mobile and wearable technology | *STEM education - particularly Science and Technology | *ARIS Games


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

Building the Deck: Creating a Library Card Game for Outreach to Transfer Students
University librarians and staff drew upon previous experience with game-based learning to develop an orientation activity for transfer students. A card game was selected due to the large number of students expected and lack of computers in the available space. Apples to Apples-style cards were created using a free online card generator. Multiple decks were printed to accommodate up to 150 players. The game exposed transfer students to information about the campus library system in a low-key way that allowed players with different knowledge levels to socialize and compete against one another on an equal basis.

Speakers
AE

Andrew Evans

Harrisonburg, VA, USA, James Madison University
avatar for Kelly Giles

Kelly Giles

Applied Sciences Librarian, James Madison University
Games in higher education, academic libraries, information literacy, the eternal struggle against plagiarism, adventure games, text adventure games, board games.
avatar for Jon Reed

Jon Reed

Harrisonburg, VA, USA, James Madison University
Social media, services promotion, event planning, community outreach in an academic library setting.
avatar for Kristen  Shuyler

Kristen Shuyler

James Madison University
Director, Outreach and Partnerships, James Madison University Libraries and Educational Technologies


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

Collaborative Game Development is BEEP!
(Developer/Publisher) and the (Non-Profit Design Organization) have been working together to turn a paper game developed with teachers at the (Innovative Public School) into a digital multiplayer game playable in classrooms around the world. The game is approaching a public beta release, and they would like to share their lessons from this productive case study in collaborative development involving the classroom, which include: going from paper to tablets, in-person to multiplayer online; embracing the differences between intended and actual implementation in the classroom; and scaling from a handful of classrooms to many subject areas and millions of users.

Speakers
MG

Michael Gi

New York, NY, United States, BrainPOP
avatar for Brendon Trombley

Brendon Trombley

Game Designer, Institute of Play
Brendon Trombley is a game designer, educator, and adventurer living in New York City. His passions involve games, technology, learning, travel, and food, and he tries to mix and match them whenever possible (be careful when combining food and technology!). | | Brendon is a graduate of the New Media Design program at Rochester Institute of Technology, where he trained in the principles of design in addition to a wide array of... Read More →


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

Connecting Gameplay, Discourse, and Assessment in a Learning Game Camp
As research and technology develop, learning environments become increasingly complex, requiring more sophisticated approaches to broaden the ways in which we assess how students learn in these environments. These Presentations will Showcase how we connected over 30 hours of discourse, millions of lines of gameplay click-stream data, and traditional pre-post assessments in a multimodal approach to a game-embedded informal learning environment, dubbed Game-A-Palooza (GAP). We then look towards other ways in which we might uncover a better understanding of learning through this multimodal data approach in a complex learning environment.

Speakers
avatar for Craig G.  Anderson

Craig G. Anderson

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
Current doctoral student in digital media focusing on how games create and keep cognitive engagement. | | Upload/Download captain GLS 2015/2016: Ask me about the arcade!
MB

Matthew Berland

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
avatar for John Binzak

John Binzak

Research Project Assistant, Games+Learning+Society
JD

Jennifer Dalsen

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
I am a doctoral student in the Curriculum & Instruction Department at UW-Madison. My research focuses on: digital access and looking at how students with disabilities learn through technological supports. I am an active collaborator with the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI) on UDL.
AJ

Anna Jordan-Douglass

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
avatar for Vishesh  Kumar

Vishesh Kumar

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
avatar for Jenny Saucerman

Jenny Saucerman

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
avatar for Constance  Steinkuehler

Constance Steinkuehler

Chair, Games+Learning+Society Conference
Constance Steinkuehler is a Professor in Digital Media at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, Co-Director of the Games+Learning+Society (GLS) center at the Wisconsin Institute of Discovery, and Chair of their annual GLS Conference. She currently serves as President of the Higher Education Videogames Alliance (HEVGA), an organization of higher education leaders whose mission is to underscore the cultural, scientific, and economic... Read More →
avatar for Aybuke  Gul Turker

Aybuke Gul Turker

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

Crossover Gamified Design: Learning and Assessment for Sustainable Engineering Education
We capture the design of a crossover gamified learning environment focused on sustainable engineering design concepts for high school students. Our study seeks to theorize upon digitally augmented, rich interactions that expand youth's access to STEM fields in crossover gamified settings. It contributes to the development and research on crossover learning and assessment designs that coordinate discipline-specific learning across real-world (informal) and classroom settings (formal). It is anticipated that such designs could enable a preparatory transition from informal, active learning activities to formal design-focused activities in a continuous loop-like process thus expanding learning opportunities for youth.

Speakers
avatar for Fariha Hayat  Salman

Fariha Hayat Salman

University Park, Pennsylvania, United States, Pennsylvania State University
I wish to be known as a learning scientist with insights into how people learn in immersive designed environments with various resources including material, technological & human sensory capacities. | | Talk to me about: | # Augmented Reality (AR) designs | # Connecting AR to Artificial Intelligence (AI) | # Crossover learning designs | # Embodied Interaction


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

Designing for Empathy Development in an iPod-based Game at the Minnesota History Center
This Poster describes the iterative and collaborative design process in use at the Minnesota Historical Society to develop an extension of its in-gallery, iPod-based game “Play the Past” into its Minnesota’s Greatest Generation exhibit. The game project is collaborating with four school partners to design a role-playing game intended to develop both cognitive and emotional empathy. Both types of empathy are viewed as contributing to the development of historical empathy, a component of historical thinking skills. The design process explores pedagogical techniques for developing empathy within a game environment that apply and examines Belman and Flanagan’s (2010) four design principles for fostering empathy in games. The game uses the Aris game platform.

Speakers
LL

Lisa Larson

Saint Paul, MN, United States, Minnesota Historical Society


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

EarthGames: Making Games Centered Around Climate Chage
develops games and other interactive experiences with the aim of increasing public awareness of environmental issues such as climate change. Interactive digital experiences are an important part of the future of education, and environmental science is particularly lacking in this area. We believe that the playful nature of games can also counter the typical “gloom-and-doom” tone of the environmental movement, giving students a sense of agency while they learn. We hope to use the power of games as an educational tool to inspire action and more sustainable habits.

Speakers
RB

Rabea Baroudi

University of Washington
KB

Kurt Blancaflor

University of Washington
ZB

Zane Brant

University of Washington
DF

Dargan Frierson

University of Washington
JL

Josh Lawler

University of Washington
SW

Sally Wei

University of Washington
DZ

Daniel Zhu

University of Washington


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

EscapED: Adapting Live-Action, Interactive Games to Support Higher Education Teaching and Learning Practices.
Game-based learning is often found to be technically driven and more often than not, serious games are conceptualised and designed solely for digital platforms and state of the art technologies. To encourage a greater discussion on the potential benefits and challenges of developing traditional games, that promote human centred, interactive play for learning, the authors present the Game Changers initiative. The Game Changers initiative is discussed and focus is drawn to one of its programmes titled; escapED, for developing non-digital approaches to science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics (STEAM) game-based learning. EscapED, aids design and creation of educational Escape Rooms and Interactive Gaming Experiences for staff and students in further/higher education settings. The authors present the escapED theoretical framework as a tool to aid future design and development of on-site interactive experiences, in order to provide engaging alternatives for learning and soft skills development amongst higher education staff and students.

Speakers
SA

Sylvester Arnab

Coventry, Warwickshire, United Kingdom, Disruptive Media Learning Lab
AB

Aikaterini Bourazeri

Coventry, Warwickshire, United Kingdom, Disruptive Media Learning Lab
SC

Samantha Clarke

Coventry, Warwickshire, United Kingdom, Disruptive Media Learning Lab
KG

Kate Green

Coventry, Warwickshire, United Kingdom, Disruptive Media Learning Lab
AM

Alex Masters

Coventry, Warwickshire, United Kingdom, Disruptive Media Learning Lab
LM

Luca Morini

Coventry, Warwickshire, United Kingdom, Disruptive Media Learning Lab
OW

Oliver Wood

Coventry, Warwickshire, United Kingdom, Disruptive Media Learning Lab


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

Ethics Simulators: Utilizing Digital Games to Study Ethical Decisions Making in an Immersive Context
This study used a digital game to create a contextually rich environment in which to study ethical decision-making. A digital game was used as a simulation to investigate the effect of exposure to an ethical code prior to decision-making in a work context. Participants were undergraduate college students enrolled in psychology courses. Immersing participants in an environment with competing incentives and social cues was expected to elicit more natural responses. The game environment also provided participants with the opportunity to make a series of decisions. Results of the study examined the level of immersion and interest in the topic that participants experienced while playing the game as well as the types of decisions they made based on the introduction of an ethical code prior to playing the game. Decision-making behavior was examined based on scores, behavior, and perceptions about the activity in a post-activity survey.

Speakers
AR

Allison Reeck

Menomonie, Wisconsin, United States, University of Wisconsin – Stout


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

Gamification and Group Work in an Undergraduate Lesson
In this study, a gamification software is developed and applied to 46 students in a three hours lesson of an undergraduate course. The learning subject was “System development life cycle: planning and analysis phases” because in the previous years, students were reported that they found this subject boring. To make the lesson more enjoyable the game-like software is developed and applied. There were two sessions, one played the game individually and the other played as small groups. All students made learning gains from the course and they reported positive feedbacks about the gamification usage in the courses. Finally small differences found between related to use of group work.

Speakers
OA

Oguz Ak

Istanbul, Turkey, Bogazici University


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

Gaming as Epistemic Practice
This paper explores into the constitutive entanglement of material (also digital) artifacts and activities of collaborative learning. Drawing on examples of students building the “University of the Future” in the virtual world of Minecraft, we depict how the epistemic function and the material qualities of the shared artifact are intertwined with the students’ efforts to articulate and transform their ideas and conception of the subject matter (the conception of higher education which underlies the “University of the Future”). Challenging techno-centric as well as human-centered notions of technology, we argue for an emergent nature of epistemic artifacts.

Speakers
HA

Heidrun Allert

Germany, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel
MF

Marten Friedrichsen

Germany, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel
CR

Christoph Richter

Germany, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

Grand Test Auto: Designing Simulator Assessments of Game-based Mental Models of Automotive Safety Technology
Drivers often have poor conceptual understanding of new driver safety systems, such as adaptive cruise control (ACC). Older drivers tend to be more willing to learn about these systems by reading manuals, but also struggle with learning the uses and limitations these safety systems. This study investigates the effect of different materials and modes of learning - tinkering with games, solving problem scenarios and reading direct instruction - on mental models of ACC and driving performance in a driving simulator. We designed written assessments to supplement the driving measures produced in the simulator in order to understand how different forms of instruction impact the ways older and younger drivers learn about ACC systems.

Speakers
avatar for Benjamin DeVane

Benjamin DeVane

Iowa City, Iowa, United States, University of Iowa
Identity & Learning | Computational Thinking | Design & Aesthetics
avatar for Ben  Miller

Ben Miller

Graduate Student, University of Iowa
I love games and digital media that can be used to teach, explore, and refocus children in healthcare settings. | | I am working on my PhD in Educational Psychology and my research interests are focused on investigating how to best utilize frameworks of learning theory and media engagement to better understand the role of technology has in instructional design within healthcare settings. | | I have professional experience providing... Read More →
avatar for Joyce  Moore

Joyce Moore

Iowa City, Iowa, United States, University of Iowa
Dr. Joyce Moore is an associate professor in the Educational Psychology program in Psychological and Quantitative Foundations Department at the University of Iowa. She earned her Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from Stanford University in 1993. She has expertise in the areas of cognition and learning, child and adolescent development, and learning sciences and education.
EV

Ethan Valentine

Iowa City, Iowa, United States, University of Iowa


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

Here Comes the Boss! Using Situated Professional Environments in Games to Promote Literacy and Career Readiness
The field of learning sciences provides evidence for the potential cognitive and motivational benefits of using games for learning. However, commercial game designers often do not take research-based educational practices into consideration. We seek to investigate how a specific instantiation of research-informed game design can improve learning, foster a greater awareness of the importance of literacy, and improve career readiness and confidence. Results suggest that research-based design practices can be effective for improving student outcomes across these dimensions. Implications for future game and study designs are discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Jane Canner

Jane Canner

New York, NY, United States, Classroom, Inc.
Professionally, I am passionate about improving the educational experience and thus the outcomes for urban students, so that they can look forward to leading productive and fulfilling lives. I believe strongly that we can't just assert that certain educational strategies or approaches work for students; we need to test them out and provide evidence that they work. Not surprisingly, I believe that games hold great potential for doing both... Read More →
avatar for Anne-Marie  Hoxie

Anne-Marie Hoxie

Vice President, Strategic Learning & Impact, Classroom, Inc
Developmental psychologist interested in learning games research, data & embedded assessments,and improving user experience.
AL

Alison Lee

New York, NY, United States, Classroom, Inc.


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

How a Storytelling Game is Played in a Preschool Classroom
The purpose of this qualitative study will be to examine how early childhood learners and their teachers experience the play of a structured cooperative storytelling game in their shared classroom environment, with specific focus on cognitive and social knowledge construction. This study will use an instrumental case study approach to observe classroom game play sessions as well as qualitative interviews to explore the features of a cooperative storytelling game play activity, to ask how these features inform understanding of cognitive and social knowledge construction, to identify best practices for developing similar activities, and to identify implications for future inquiry. Thematic analysis of observations and interviews will be used to facilitate understanding of learner and teacher experiences in order to inform broader understanding of games-based play in early childhood classrooms.

Speakers
JS

Jeremy Sydik

Lincoln, NE, United States, University of Nebraska Lincoln


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

How do Pre-K Teachers and Students Experience Literacy Games? Exploring affordances of table games in a preschool classroom
The purpose of this qualitative instrumental case study will be to examine affordances of literacy table games in a preschool classroom environment and experiences of students and teachers playing the games. The study will explore factors relating to games and play, developmentally appropriate practice, emergent literacy skills, motivation, cognition, and sociocultural considerations. Themes will be based on observations of classroom game play and interviews with preschool children and teachers. The study will provide a broader understanding of games-based play in early childhood classrooms, help to develop informed best practices for similar activities, and provide implications for future inquiry.

Speakers
avatar for Katherine Sydik

Katherine Sydik

Graduate Student, University of Nebraska-Lincoln


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

iVs and iPads: How Joint Media Engagement Helps Children “Cope with Pokes”
Most children experience painful medical procedures as part of their routine health maintenance. Adults can help reduce a child’s distress through distraction coaching; a technique to divert their attention away from the painful stimulus and engage in something more rewarding. Mobile apps are widely available and a useful tool for capturing the attention of children in unique ways. The principles of Joint Media Engagement offers insights for increasing the efficacy of iPads in distraction coaching by promoting co-engagement of media that sustains a child’s attention during painful medical procedures.

Speakers
avatar for Benjamin DeVane

Benjamin DeVane

Iowa City, Iowa, United States, University of Iowa
Identity & Learning | Computational Thinking | Design & Aesthetics
KH

Kirsten Hanrahan

Iowa City, Iowa, United States, University of Iowa
AM

Ann Marie McCarthy

Iowa City, Iowa, United States, University of Iowa
avatar for Ben  Miller

Ben Miller

Graduate Student, University of Iowa
I love games and digital media that can be used to teach, explore, and refocus children in healthcare settings. | | I am working on my PhD in Educational Psychology and my research interests are focused on investigating how to best utilize frameworks of learning theory and media engagement to better understand the role of technology has in instructional design within healthcare settings. | | I have professional experience providing... Read More →


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

Let’s Be A Real Estate Entrepreneur! A Game of Socially (Ir)Responsible Real Estate Development
Since the 2008 Olympics held in Beijing and the 2015 Tianjin explosion, real estate development in China has been critiqued by many people, both internally and externally of China. In this Poster session, the authors will describe one element for teaching and outreach created for the MIT Real Estate Entrepreneurship Lab to engage Chinese students on topics of socially responsible real estate entrepreneurship and urban development, a multiplayer video game developed for tablets and mobile devices. The game will serve as the backbone for a 2-week summer workshop curriculum held at Chinese universities and high schools.

Speakers
RE

Richard Eberhardt

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
SV

Sara Verrilli

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Sara Verrilli is the Development Director at the MIT Game Lab. She teaches CMS.301, Introduction To Design Methods and CMS.611/6.073, Creating Video Games at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She joined the Singapore-GAMBIT Game Lab in 2008 as Quality Assurance director. Later, she became the development director, and organized and ran the GAMBIT Game Lab's Summer Program, a nine week intensive game development program for Singaporean... Read More →


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

Life Beyond the Grant: Creative Dissemination Strategies
Over the past decade, the authors have collaborated on the development of location-based augmented reality games for use in formal and informal contexts. As their current grant is winding down, they have sought innovative ways to support expansion to new sites. To work toward that goal, they jointly offered an eight-week webinar series which included a mix of conceptual discussions, annotated examples of successful game projects, and hands-on practice with the game development tools. In this presentation, the structure of the webinar series and samples of the ancillary support materials will be shared, along with program evaluation data reflecting critical factors which contributed to successful replication at some sites, and delineation of obstacles which made transfer of innovative game-based tools to other sites difficult.

Speakers
avatar for Susan Baron

Susan Baron

Education Programs Coordinator, Missouri Botanical Garden
BC

Bob Coulter

Director, Missouri Botanical Garden
Bob is the director of the Litzsinger Road Ecology Center, an R&D-focused division of the Missouri Botanical Garden. As part of that work, Bob leads game-based learning initiatives using augmented reality and agent-based modeling tools.
EK

Eric Klopfer

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Dr. Eric Klopfer is Professor and Director of the Scheller Teacher Education Program and The Education Arcade at MIT. Klopfer’s research focuses on the development and use of computer games and simulations for building understanding of science and complex systems. His research explores simulations and games on desktop computers as well as mobile devices like smartphones and tablets. Klopfer’s work combines the construction of new software... Read More →
avatar for Judy Perry

Judy Perry

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Judy currently oversees design, development and research for several projects involving games and simulations for mobile devices, including smartphones and tablets. Her research interests include location-based games and ubiquitous “casual” games. When she is not making or playing mobile games, Judy also leads professional development workshops for educators who want to implement location-based and other games in both formal and informal... Read More →
LS

Lisa Stump

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

Literacy and Learning through Game Design: An Afterschool Twine Workshop .
This Poster describes a research project based on an afterschool game design workshop. This workshop was intended to teach the tool Twine to 5th and 6th grade girls. Twine has been lauded as an accessible design tool, but thus far little research has been conducted on it. This mixed-methods study explores the ways in which girls engaged with the literacy and programming aspects of the tool, as well as the ways in which they brought their own Internet literacies and knowledge of pop culture to bear on the games which they made. Implications for teaching game design in and out of school will be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Kelly Tran

Kelly Tran

Tempe, Arizona, USA, Arizona State University
PhD Student at Arizona State University.
MW

Mikaela Wallin

Tempe, Arizona, USA, Arizona State University


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

MasterSwords: Competition, collaboration, and community in a multimodal battle of words.
This Poster will explore how one group of urban elementary school students engage with a video game designed to foster literacy. Particular attention will be paid to the socially situated interactions surrounding the game’s competitive battle mode. Through our case study we hope to better understand how a fighting game mechanic that uses words and spelling might cultivate collaboration, community, and New Media Literacy in youth.

Speakers
LG

Lynn Gatto

Rochester , NY, USA, University of Rochester
JM

Joe Mauriello

Amplify Games


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

Mission HydroSci: Designing a Game for Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)
Mission HydroSci is a game-based 3D virtual environment for supporting student learning related to water systems science and scientific argumentation. Scientific argumentation is a central epistemic practice within science and necessary for the kind of science learning envisioned by the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Our Poster discusses our progress in year 1 of a funded project to develop a game for middle school science education as well as presents critical lessons learned.

Speakers
JG

Joseph Griffin

University of Missouri
avatar for So Mi Kim

So Mi Kim

Columbia, Missouri, United States of America, University of Missouri
avatar for james  laffey

james laffey

Columbia, Missouri, United States of America, University of Missouri
TS

Troy Sadler

Columbia, Missouri, United States of America, University of Missouri
JS

Justin Sigoloff

Columbia, Missouri, United States of America, University of Missouri


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

More than Me: Expanding Possibilities through Connected Multiplayer Location-Based Augmented Reality Games
Prior work on location-based augmented reality (AR) games demonstrates that even in single-player games, in which non-networked mobile devices run independent instances of a particular game, players can have meaningful interactions and discussion around gameplay. However, technical constraints of single-player modes limit AR players’ peer interactions, which primarily occur in the real world. A shared true multiplayer experience would enable players to participate in more robust, collaborative experiences by connecting players to a shared game world. Connected players could collectively utilize limited game assets, communicate over distances, and impact other players’ digital game state. To explore these affordances, [PLATFORM] recently added multiplayer functionality to its existing single-player offering. This paper describes the initial release version of multiplayer features, outlines the rationale for these design decisions, and proposes additional research questions for future research.

Speakers
AN

Arjun Narayanan

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
avatar for Judy Perry

Judy Perry

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Judy currently oversees design, development and research for several projects involving games and simulations for mobile devices, including smartphones and tablets. Her research interests include location-based games and ubiquitous “casual” games. When she is not making or playing mobile games, Judy also leads professional development workshops for educators who want to implement location-based and other games in both formal and informal... Read More →
LS

Lisa Stump

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

Out-of-school literacies back into classroom: Game, video and prosumer
One of the core concerns in learning sciences is “What new types of learning have emerged in digital natives in the gaming generation?” There are varied ways to inquire into the question of they have learned. In 21 century, new way of reusing, remixing, and re-making information/game/image/video is in particular attractive to youths. This highlights the importance for educators and policy makers to understand where our youths are in terms of their capabilities to participate in the new media ecology. This capability can be conceptualized as prosumption. In this study, we empirically study the gaming generation bring their prosumption abilities into classroom. Prosumer is capable of intricately embedding his values and thoughts. Such insights are important and viewed as “a prerequisite” for effective participation in the 21st century information society.

Speakers
TC

Tieh-huai Chang

National Central University
FC

Fei-Ching Chen

National Central University
MJ

Ming-Fong Jan

National Central University


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

Parent-child Joint App Use and Early Numeracy Development
This qualitative case study was conducted to explore parent-child interaction in intergenerational play of numeracy-related Apps. A Chinese mother and her preschool-age son in a Midwestern university town were observed using several numeracy-related mobile game apps together. Our analysis of the observations and the interview with the mother revealed that parents might mediate preschooler’s App play, but their engagement might take a different shape than what Joint Media Engagement theory envisions. It provided insights about designing good App number-related games for parents and children to engage together.

Speakers
avatar for Benjamin DeVane

Benjamin DeVane

Iowa City, Iowa, United States, University of Iowa
Identity & Learning | Computational Thinking | Design & Aesthetics


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

Player Agency and Content Retention in Educational Games
Games are now prevalent enough in the mainstream entertainment culture to be an inevitable inclusion in classrooms seeking to motivate and engage students. This study proposes to investigate how educational games can be developed to be more effective instructional tools by examining the effects of individual game design components on learning outcomes. To that end, the proposed experiment will test an agency supporting game condition against a game condition which diminishes agency to determine what effect, if any, player agency has on the retention of educational content and the play experience in educational games.

Speakers
JD

Jenifer Doll

University of Minnesota
KV

Keisha Varma

University of Minnesota


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

Proteus Play on a STEM-Game Platform: Examining the role of avatar identity and self-relevance on STEM attitudes and motivation
This study examines how different aspects of avatar use on a science-game web platform influences motivation to play science games on this platform as well as STEM interest and STEM-learning self-efficacy. We developed a science-game web platform for this research on which we are testing our expectation that using a science-related avatar (compared to a general avatar), especially when this avatar is customized (not simply assigned), will lead to more positive effects on STEM-learning self-efficacy, STEM interest, and motivation to play STEM games. Data is being collected at a Midwestern university from undergraduate students as well as middle school-aged children. We hope to present the full results of this data collection and analysis at the GLS conference.

Speakers
avatar for Leticia  Cherchiglia

Leticia Cherchiglia

East Lansing, MI, United States, Michigan State University
AK

Amanda Klug

Michigan State University
SO

Samantha Oldenburg

East Lansing, MI, United States, Michigan State University
RR

Rabindra Ratan

East Lansing, MI, United States, Michigan State University
avatar for Harrison  Sanders

Harrison Sanders

Student, Michigan State University
RS

Rachel Stacey

East Lansing, MI, United States, Michigan State University
CW

Celina Wanek

East Lansing, MI, United States, Michigan State University


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

Revealing Stealth Health: Examining Agency in Physical Activity Games
This Poster presents a framework for analyzing games that are designed to impact players’ physical health in some way. Our analysis is grounded primarily in the notion of player agency (or, in many cases, lack thereof) relative to players’ own bodies, behavior, and health. We borrow the concept of “stealth health” from nutrition research to articulate this problem with agency, and the Poster will analyze several examples of commercial games or research-designed games that represent distinctions among various kinds of player agency and motivation.

Speakers
avatar for Cynthia Ching

Cynthia Ching

Associate Professor of Learning and Mind Sciences, University of California, Davis
Technology and identity, personal data gaming, embodied cognition, games and behavior.
RR

Roxanne Rashedi

University of California, Davis
SS

Sara Schaefer

University of California, Davis


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

Sherlock: Gameful software for learning and evaluation
This workshop introduces users to the Sherlock software system. Sherlock is a gameful web-based tool that can use any YouTube video, and requires the learner to tag events in the video as they occur using custom buttons specified by the activity designer. Sherlock activities can be formative or summative in nature. In this workshop, attendees will learn about how Sherlock works, have the opportunity to create and test their own activities in Sherlock, and will be introduced to the basic technical requirements for setting up their own instance of Sherlock.

Speakers
avatar for Moses Wolfenstein

Moses Wolfenstein

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin, Extension
Moses has worked in the field of education for over a decade, and has been studying and creating games and other digital media for learning since 2006. He holds a PhD from the University of Wisconsin–Madison in Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis where he worked with his adviser Rich Halverson on games for school leadership. As SeniorInteraction Developer at University of Wisconsin-Extension, Moses works to improve user experiences and... Read More →


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

Spirit Quest: Lessons from a Campus-wide Game Development Project
This Poster examines a campus-wide game development project at a comprehensive public university. The game, Spirit Quest, incentivizes students to learn about campus services, faculty, student life, and the “habits of mind” of effective college students. The game also aligns with several campus initiatives related to general education and student success. The team that proposed and created the game comprises faculty and administrators from across campus, including departments of engineering, English, education, and developmental studies, as well as administrative units related to instructional technology, student services, learning resources, and general education. The Poster will discuss the process of conceptualizing and creating the game from multiple institutional perspectives, including the lead designer and project lead, the lead developer, and the lead administrative liaison. Together, these perspectives offer different points of view on the lessons learned as the team engaged in a complex game development project.

Speakers
avatar for David  Dannenberg

David Dannenberg

Director, Academic Innovations & eLearning, University of Alaska Anchorage
avatar for Kenrick  Mock

Kenrick Mock

Professor of Computer Science, University of Alaska Anchorage
avatar for Jennifer  Stone

Jennifer Stone

Associate Professor of English, University of Alaska Anchorage
My work specializes in sociocultural and critical approaches to literacy studies. In my research, I focus on how individuals, families, and communities accumulate literacy resources across home, community, school, workplace, civic, and affinity-based contexts. In particular, I have examined the roles that language diversity (such as dialect, indigenous and world languages, other forms of representation, and community networks), digital... Read More →


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

Stealth Assessment in SimScientists Ecosystems Games
SimScientists Games use evidence-centered design and stealth assessment to gauge student performance on middle school ecosystems content and practice assessment targets. We present a Food Web Puzzle game being developed in Unity3D Pro/WebGL that communicates with a Bayesian network via an LMS that allows the game to adapt to the student based on the student model.

Speakers
LH

Lisa Holt

Rockville, MD, United States, Intelligent Automation, Inc.
avatar for Matt Silberglitt

Matt Silberglitt

Senior Research Associate, WestEd
avatar for Jody  Underwood

Jody Underwood

Senior Managing Learning Scientist, Intelligent Automation, Inc.


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

Stereotypes, Games and Your Bladedancer Self: Using avatar customization to reduce stereotype threat effects
This study investigates the relationship between videogames and STEM and gendered stereotypes within both fields. While a number of programs have recently been developed to use videogames as a possible catalyst in promoting more interest in STEM fields, the negative perceptions which women must overcome in STEM fields also resonate in videogame culture. By introducing stereotype threat within a videogame activity, we attempt to replicate previous findings that these negative incidents can influence both in-game performance but also gendered perceptions related to STEM and career aspirations. The present study also observes the role multiple identities can have on moderating the effects of stereotype threat through the creation of in-game avatars. Although data collection is still at an early stage, initial results Showcase that priming different versions of self to express within an avatar can influence how players deal with these threats. \ \

Speakers
AC

Adam Cockman

East Lansing, MI, United States, Michigan State University
JF

Joseph Fordham

East Lansing, MI, United States, Michigan State University
MO

Madison Ozdych

East Lansing, MI, United States, Michigan State University
RR

Rabindra Ratan

East Lansing, MI, United States, Michigan State University
LS

Luke Sienko

East Lansing, MI, United States, Michigan State University
KS

Kyle Silva

East Lansing, MI, United States, Michigan State University
CW

Celina Wanek

East Lansing, MI, United States, Michigan State University
WZ

Whitney Zhou

East Lansing, MI, United States, Michigan State University


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

TAXONOMY AND FLOW – ENGAGING VIRTUAL CLASSROOMS AND PLAYER ARCHETYPES
Digital games are an ideal form of media with which to present engaging content, in that they can create enriching applications of taught information beyond the confines of the classroom. MMOs engage players on multiple levels by providing worlds to explore, achievements to reach, challenges to overcome, and players with which to interact, creating a unique micro-culture. These explicitly designed multiplayer cultures have the capacity to be more than an educational experience for one student, but give multiple students the ability to interact, learn and apply what they’ve learned together at a global level (Squire, 2012). As a former AAA and mobile game designer, I will review the core concepts of MMO design as they relate to the psychological state of flow and overlay the Bartle taxonomy of player types to illustrate how each aspect can work together to create an optimal experience for play and learning.

Speakers
avatar for Stephen  Mallory

Stephen Mallory

PhD Student, School of Arts, Technology and Emerging Communications, University of Texas at Dallas
I was a professional game designer for a decade, working on everything from mobile to AAA console games. Education and teaching have long been a passion, and so I'm working to bring my professional experience to the academe, studying how we can better leverage things like flow theory and the concept of cognitive tools to create optimal educational game experiences.


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

Testing an Educational Videogame in a setting with Limited Technology Access
Using videogames as a learning tool is not new and it has been Showcasen to be effective in most cases; however the setting and environment in which these tools are used seems to have a great impact on the results. Using our own serious educational videogame, a study was conducted in a rural (low SES) school where students have limited access to computers and technology. The main objective was to assess if the involvement of students with videogames in rural schools could result in an increase in performance and such increase could be maintained. Results indicated that indeed there is an increase in performance and in most cases it is sustained.

Speakers
avatar for Hugo  Enriquez

Hugo Enriquez

Guatemala, Galileo University
Games and Learning, Game Design, Game Development, Gaming, Game Industry, JRPGs


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

The Well-Researched Game: Using Game Design and Development in First-Year Composition
Writing a documented argument, on the one hand, and game design and development, on the other, are in many respects, kindred endeavors. Both projects require investigating experiences or phenomena, studying causes and effects, drafting and revision, rhetorical analysis of readers/players, and internalization and application of formats and best practices corresponding to the genre. Add to a research and documentation component to the game development process, and the nature of the two types of classroom activities become virtually interchangeable. The lingering difference lies in the respective final product. The paper accomplishes its purposes through argument supported by logic; the game, learning by immersion. This Presentation Showcasecases tabletop games designed and developed in a face-to-face freshman composition class as well as the documentation of their journeys.

Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

Towards an Understanding of Player Decisions and Learning During Video Gameplay: The Gamer Response and Decision Framework
This paper presents the Gamer Response and Decision (GRAD) Framework as an approach to examining video gameplay experiences with an emphasis on gamer interpretation, decision-making, and learning processes during gameplay. The GRAD Framework draws from Rosenblatt’s Reader Response Theory and concepts from new literacies, psychology, and game studies. This framework posits each gamer has a unique experience during video gameplay, as all gamers have unique knowledge, experiences, skills, goals, and sense of agency and self-efficacy that influence their interpretations, decisions, and learning during gameplay. The gamer’s decisions affect how the game unfolds, which feed back to the gamer in the form of unique experiences and perceptions. Gamers learn about the video games and strategies for success through this recursive process of interpretation and decision making. This paper explores these ideas in depth and illustrates how the GRAD Framework can be used by researchers and educators to accomplish their educational goals.

Speakers
SV

Sam von Gillern

Ames, Iowa, USA, Iowa State University


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

Towards Improved Literacy in Computer Programming Among Artists
Artists are creative people who excel in creating very complex 3D images, animation and sound presentations but find it difficult and cumbersome to deal with low-level programming details. Visual programming techniques (also known as visual studios) are visual only to the coders with computer science backgrounds; to the artists, visual studios still look like a medical prescription and taste like medicine. Recent releases in visual game programming environments and game engines such as Unity, Unreal, and GameSalad appear to be promising to advance the art of programming to non-programmers. In this paper we share our plans and preliminary experience in using those game engines to build a community college level course in programming for artists and other non-CS majors.

Speakers
EG

Elliot Gertner

Santa Ana, California, United States, Santa Ana College
PW

Patricia Waterman

Santa Ana, California, United States, Santa Ana College


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

Videogames and Distributed Teaching and Learning Systems
This Poster develops a theory of distributed teaching and learning systems (DTALS) and provides two case studies using the videogame Dota 2 and the game development program Twine. DTALS extends work on “Big ‘G’ games” and “affinity spaces” (Gee, 2003) with a particular emphasis on the teaching that occurs across a range of sites within and around videogames, and what that might tell us about teaching and learning more broadly. Furthermore, we are interested in understanding the relationships among these spaces, resources, practices, and people. Rather than viewing them as a haphazard collection of game-related teaching events or tools, we argue for understanding them as comprising a complex, dynamic, adaptive, and distributed system.

Speakers
avatar for Elisabeth Gee

Elisabeth Gee

Tempe, Arizona, USA, Arizona State University
I'm the Associate Director of the Center for Games & Impact at ASU, and co-directing the Play2Connect initiative with Dr. Sinem Siyahhan at Cal State-San Marcos. I'm interested in gender and gaming, game-based affinity spaces, and intergenerational play.
avatar for Jeffrey Brandon Holmes

Jeffrey Brandon Holmes

Tempe, Arizona, USA, Arizona State University
Jeff Holmes is a Founding Graduate Fellow at the Center for Games and Impact at Arizona State University, a PhD student in Rhetoric and Composition in the Department of English, and a life-long gamer. His research focuses on how games demonstrate good principles of teaching outside of school, how communities collectively construct identities, and how gaming and play extend to multiple sites beyond the traditional boundaries of 'gamespace.' In... Read More →
avatar for Kelly Tran

Kelly Tran

Tempe, Arizona, USA, Arizona State University
PhD Student at Arizona State University.


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

5:00pm

World-Building 101: Application of Contemporary Learning Theory in Game Design
Commercial and educational game developers frequently draw upon the same principles of problem-based instruction to create cooperative, engaging, and “fun” gamespaces. Yet, there is little information about the way game mechanics, narrative structures, and peripheral tools (e.g., forums, cheat guides, mods) influence the skills needed to be a successful 21st century learner. In response, data collected from in-game interactions of 14 practicing educators were used to conduct a qualitative grounded theory analysis of a text-based alternate reality/roleplaying game developed under a situated cognition, Technology, Pedagogy, Content Knowledge, and Learning Theory (TPACK-L) framework. Findings suggest that TPACK-L, combined with the ADDIE instructional design model, may have multiple affordances for iterative design and the alignment of commercial and educational game developer goals.

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Slota

Stephen Slota

Co-Founder, The Pericles Group, LLC
Steve (@steveslota) is an instructional design specialist and game design scientist at the University of Connecticut Health Center and a co-founder of The Pericles Group, LLC. He holds a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology: Cognition, Instruction, & Learning Technologies and has worked on a variety of game and instructional design projects with organizations including Arizona State University's Center for Games & Impact, Intel Corporation, and... Read More →
MY

Michael Young

CT, United States, University of Connecticut, Storrs


Wednesday August 17, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Varsity Hall Union South

7:00pm

Higher Education Video Games Alliance (HEVGA) Social
The Higher Education Video Game Alliance invites you to join us at a celebration of games in higher education on Wednesday, August 17 after the poster session. Major announcements on membership and our plans for 2017 to be made. Join us for drinks, appetizers and great company.

Wednesday August 17, 2016 7:00pm - 9:00pm
Pavillion

7:00pm

Arcade & Games Tournament
Have some time to kill before the next talk? Come check out the GLS Arcade where we'll have all the newest gen consoles, complete with a huge stack of great games; a Dance and Jam games section to get you moving; a PC section for your Hearthstone or League of Legends fix; and (new to GLS) a Virtual Reality section including multiple Occulus DK2 and HTC Vive! Is there any better way to get to know your fellow game scholars, developers, and enthusiasts?

GLS is excited to announce the first ever Games Tournaments to be held  throughout the conference! Come test your game skills against other game scholars, developers, and enthusiasts! Prizes and glory await the winners! 

There are rolling high-scores for Guitar Hero, DDR, and Forza. People can play these at any time and have a volunteer record their highscore.

Bracket tournament games for Thursday evening: Smash Bros Brawl, Smash Bros WiiU, Mortal Kombat X, Splatoon, Halo, and Johan Sabastien Joust. These each have a sign up sheet that I will randomly place people into brackets from. Walk-ins welcome.  

Wednesday August 17, 2016 7:00pm - 10:00pm
Northwoods Union South
 
Thursday, August 18
 

9:30am

Coffee & Pastries
Freshly brewed Madison based Steep & Brew regular and decaf coffee, hot water and assorted herbal and regular teas, with bakery items such as bagels with cream cheese, croissants, assorted muffins, banana nut bread, and Hawaiian mango bread.

Gluten free pasteries available, please indicate dietary restrictions on registration form.

Thursday August 18, 2016 9:30am - 10:00am
Marquee Union South

10:00am

Keynote
Speakers
avatar for Elisabeth Gee

Elisabeth Gee

Tempe, Arizona, USA, Arizona State University
I'm the Associate Director of the Center for Games & Impact at ASU, and co-directing the Play2Connect initiative with Dr. Sinem Siyahhan at Cal State-San Marcos. I'm interested in gender and gaming, game-based affinity spaces, and intergenerational play.
avatar for Sinem Siyahhan

Sinem Siyahhan

Sinem Siyahhan is an Assistant Professor of Educational Technology and Learning Sciences at California State University, and the Founding Director of Play2Connect, an initiative that aims to support family learning, communication, and connection through gaming. Her scholarship uses design-based research to understand the affordances of digital media technologies, in particular video games, for human-computer interaction, teaching, learning, and... Read More →

Opening Words

Thursday August 18, 2016 10:00am - 11:00am
Marquee Union South

11:30am

Design considerations in game dashboards for teachers
Many current data dashboards in educational games have failed to capture teacher needs and gain widespread use in the classroom as an assessment tool. Drawing on results from an in-depth session with teachers and Edtech providers, we will present key points about how dashboards can be used to meet specific teacher needs most effectively. We will present a common vocabulary for comparing and contrasting different kinds of game dashboards. We will also share how the vocabulary and key points relate to dashboards in BrainPOP, Learning Game Network, and Classroom, Inc’s own games and plans for improving them.

Speakers
CD

Charlotte Duncan

Associate Director of Product Development, Learning Games Network
avatar for Anne-Marie  Hoxie

Anne-Marie Hoxie

Vice President, Strategic Learning & Impact, Classroom, Inc
Developmental psychologist interested in learning games research, data & embedded assessments,and improving user experience.
avatar for Kevin  Miklasz

Kevin Miklasz

New York, NY, United States, BrainPOP
I work on games, data, assessment, learner-centered education, and science.


Thursday August 18, 2016 11:30am - 12:30pm
Wisconsin Idea Union South

11:30am

Panel: The Assessment Game — Moving Beyond Traditional Measures
Educational and serious games can facilitate a wide variety of transformations in learners, which can in turn impact both peers and educators in the learner’s environment. These transformations may include changes in knowledge and behaviors to changes in beliefs, attitudes and values. Despite a substantial body of innovations around assessment of game-based learning, most frequently-used evaluation methods are limited to simple knowledge-gain measures. How do we leverage the power of game-based learning and assessment, while responding to demands for evidence of effectiveness and validity? This Panel brings their diverse experiences in game-based assessment to a group discussion, helping game developers think beyond traditional assessments, with examples of more innovative ways to measure impact. After a short discussion from the Panel, the Panel will play The Assessment Game, proposing a variety of assessment strategies for randomly assigned content, audiences and transformations generated through audience participation.

Speakers
avatar for Jodi Asbell-Clarke

Jodi Asbell-Clarke

Director, TERC
I direct a team of game designers, researchers, and learning scientists who live and work on the edge of science and play.
avatar for Barbara Chamberlin

Barbara Chamberlin

Professor, Game Developer, New Mexico State University
Barbara Chamberlin directs game and media development at New Mexico State University’s Learning Games Lab. The production team works on a variety of content and audiences, most recently completing Math Snacks games for mid school learners (mathsnacks.org). Dr. Chamberlin also conducts research on game-based learning, specializing in formative testing and methodologies for taking products through development with users. Learn more at... Read More →
avatar for Allisyn Levy

Allisyn Levy

VP, GameUp, BrainPOP
Since joining BrainPOP in 2007, Allisyn Levy has played an integral role in the creation, launch, and continued development of BrainPOP Educators, our online professional community. Now, as Vice President, GameUp, she leads outreach efforts for BrainPOP's online learning games portal, a collection of top, cross-curricular game titles from leading game creators. Allisyn is a National Board Certified Teacher who spent 11 years as an elementary... Read More →
avatar for Michelle  Riconscente

Michelle Riconscente

President, Designs for Learning


Thursday August 18, 2016 11:30am - 12:30pm
Traditions Union South

11:30am

Telescope to Tablet: Using Real-World Data to Design an Astronomy Game
Introductory astronomy courses at the collegiate level are popular courses taken by non-science majors often seeking to fulfill a distribution requirement. The typical ASTR 101 student is not looking for a mathematically rigorous introduction to the discipline, but is keenly interested in black holes and constellations. Student expectations are often at odds with those of their professor who wants to introduce them to the incredible insights we have gained about the universe. Professors face the challenge of communicating quantitatively laden subject matter in a manner that does not threaten non-scientists. At Play in the Cosmos is an educational game designed to engage non-science majors by piquing their interest in our modern understanding of the Solar System, Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe. In this paper, we outline the way the game design is used to teach fundamental astronomical concepts and the process of science by incorporating real scientific data. We provide a detailed account of how the development team used player feedback to enhance the game’s design and conclude with an overview of the game’s features from storyboard to final product.

Speakers
avatar for Mike Beall

Mike Beall

Project Leader, Learning Games Network
I am a Game Designer, Project Leader, and Artist working with the Learning Games Network and Games Learning Society. In addition to direct involvement with design and development of many GLS/LGN games, I also work with local schools and community centers where I engage with University of Wisconsin-Madison faculty and students to conduct playtests, interviews, and focus group tests.
JD

Jennifer Dalsen

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
I am a doctoral student in the Curriculum & Instruction Department at UW-Madison. My research focuses on: digital access and looking at how students with disabilities learn through technological supports. I am an active collaborator with the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI) on UDL.
avatar for Kurt Squire

Kurt Squire

Co-Director, Games+Learning+Society Center
Kurt Squire is a Professor of Digital Media in the Department of Curriculum & Instruction, and Co-Director of the Games+Learning+Society Center in the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery. Squire is the author or editor of three books, and over 75 scholarly publications on learning with technology. Squire has directed several game-based learning projects, ranging from ARIS, a tool for place-based mobile app development, to ProgenitorX, a game... Read More →


Thursday August 18, 2016 11:30am - 12:30pm
Landmark Union South

11:30am

HISTORY, CIVICS & (DIGITAL) CITIZENSHIP
Occupied Paris: Cultural Immersion in the Past
Nelson

Session will present results from 2 pilot tests of Paris Occupé, a role-playing game created in ARIS where students complete tasks and make choices in 3 "chapters" tied to different aspects of Parisian life during Nazi Occupation (World War II). The complexity of the period with its multiple governments, difficult living conditions and moral/ethical choices make it both interesting and challenging to teach. Typically, students minimize the complexity of the time and simply claim “I would have resisted,” as if it were an easy choice. Role-play personalizes the experience for students while giving them both mandatory tasks and free choices (all historically accurate). Individual student game play was supported by class activities to build historical understanding. Results of pilot tests Showcase growth in language production, complexity of reasoning and empathy with the past.

Creating, Crafting, and Coding Collaborative Controllers for Promoting “Habits of Participatory Civics”
Dishon & Kafai

The civic world is rapidly changing in response to the affordances of the digital age, which ushered the rise of participatory civics: interactive peer-based modes of civic action. In the spirit of Dewey’s vision of civic education as participation in a community, we suggest that collaborative game making can serve as a uniquely ripe setting for youth to practice and develop such participatory modes of civic interaction. We call this micro-civics education: nurturing habits of participatory civics outside of explicitly civic contexts. In a pilot study, 13 high school freshmen designed in small groups collaborative controllers for video games with Scratch and Makey-Makey. Our analysis focused on the ways in which collaborative game making potentially cultivates habits attuned to the challenges of participatory civics: engaging youth in interactive, peer-based and open-ended design processes, while demanding they reflect on the needs, perceptions and behaviors of diverse others.

Privacy, Pedagogy, and Protocols: A Preliminary Report on a Cross-Border Alternate Reality Game to Teach Digital Citizenship
Fallon & Darvasi

Blind Protocol is an elaborate alternate reality game (ARG) that pits two schools against each other in mock cyber engagement. The month-long game’s key objective is to unmask the rival school’s identity and location using in-game tools and gradually acquired knowledge on issues surrounding online privacy and security. The game was co-designed by two teachers from the US and Canada, and its first iteration was played in January - February 2015. The teacher presenters will review student feedback and report on the virtues and pitfalls of addressing an evolving and hot-button topic as a sustained, embodied and narrative-driven game.

Discussants
avatar for Benjamin DeVane

Benjamin DeVane

Iowa City, Iowa, United States, University of Iowa
Identity & Learning | Computational Thinking | Design & Aesthetics

Speakers
avatar for Paul Darvasi

Paul Darvasi

Teacher, Royal St. George's College
Paul Darvasi teaches high school English and media studies at Royal St. George's College in Toronto, Canada. He's a PhD candidate in York University's Faculty of Education, with a focus on digital and pervasive games in educational environments. He experiments with video games and interactive technology in his classes, unpacking texts with student produced digital museums, hypertext and transmedia. He designed The Ward Game, a 30-day pervasive... Read More →
GD

Gideon Dishon

University of Pennsylvania
avatar for John Fallon

John Fallon

English teacher, Fairfield Country Day School
John Fallon is a 7th & 9th grade English teacher at Fairfield Country Day School, a Prek-9 all boys school in Connecticut. His first game based learning project was a pervasive Alternate Reality Game to support the teaching of Homer's Odyssey in his 7th grade class. John also co-designed Blind Protocol, an inter-school Alternate Reality Game that instructs on privacy and surveillance in his 9th grade class. John is passionate about advocating... Read More →
YK

Yasmin Kafai

University of Pennsylvania
Yasmin Kafai is Professor of Learning Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania. She is a researcher, designer, and developer of online communities and tools (ecrafting.org, stitchtfest.org, and scratch.mit.edu) to promote computational participation, crafting, and creativity across K-16. Book publications include Connected Code, Connected Play, The Computer Clubhouse, Textile Messages, and Beyond Barbie and Mortal Kombat. Kafai earned a... Read More →
avatar for Terri Nelson

Terri Nelson

Professor, Cal State, San Bernardino
I've been using gaming for foreign language teaching since before it was "cool" so it's exciting to find like-minded colleagues . My first big project, an email murder mystery, received an Honorable Mention for Outstanding Online Course Award from the Paul Allen Virtual Education Foundation in 1998. That was back in the days when I had to teach students how to use email. After half a decade working in an administrative role I'm now happily... Read More →


Thursday August 18, 2016 11:30am - 12:30pm
Agriculture Union South

11:30am

Well-Played Narrative Adaptivity: Consequentiality and Story Pathways in Dreamfall Chapters
Dreamfall Chapters, a new episodic RPG from Red Thread Games, innovates on its legacy action-adventure genre by developing choice-customized narrative. In addition to the role-playing immersion offered by user-adaptive narrative, the game enriches story through multi-dimensional characters, strong dialogue and voice acting, and story-aligned mechanics. Although imperfect, the single-player Chapters breaks ground in the frontier of branching, user-adaptive story progression—while holding a steady, deep tone in character development and dialogue that remains true to its classic RPG roots.

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Owen

Elizabeth Owen

Director, Learning & Data Science, Age of Learning
Elizabeth Owen holds a PhD in Digital Media (School of Education) from UW-Madison, focused on game-based learning analytics. Currently the Director of Learning and Data Science at Age of Learning, she's committed to optimizing adaptive learning systems through applied machine learning. Previously a researcher and data scientist with GlassLab Games (EA campus), LRNG, and Metacog, her doctoral work is rooted at the Games+Learning+Society Center... Read More →


Thursday August 18, 2016 11:30am - 12:30pm
Marquee Union South

11:30am

Designing for DIY: Presentationing through Tensions, Lessons, and Questions to Guide Innovative Learning Environments
How do we apply lessons learned from research on do-it-yourself (DIY) media in conscious design of practical learning environments, from classrooms to after-school clubs to websites? From fanfiction writing to video game design, DIY media has provided rich opportunities for learning. Yet while individual sites or particular youth may stand out as success stories, applying principles learned from such research into our own designed educational settings remains a challenge. In this workshop we invite participants to join in productive conversation about “tensions” faced in connecting theory to practice in thinking through design principles for creating educational affinity spaces.

Speakers
DF

Deborah Fields

Research Consultant + Assistant Professor, Utah State University
Dr. Deborah A. Fields is a Temporary Assistant Professor in Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences at Utah State University and an independent research consultant. Deborah researches children’s connective learning and identity engagement through designing with digital technologies in ways that bridge informal and formal learning contexts. She is the co-PI on the Kids' DIY Media Project (kidsdiymedia.com) aimed at identifying and... Read More →
SG

Sara Grimes

Toronto, Ontario, Canada, University of Toronto
avatar for Jayne C. Lammers

Jayne C. Lammers

Assistant professor, University of Rochester
affinity space research; online research methods; videogame and other digital literacies; writing; 21st century learning; adolescent literacies; English teacher preparation
AM

Alecia Magnifico

Assistant professor, University of New Hampshire


Thursday August 18, 2016 11:30am - 12:30pm
Industry Union South

11:30am

Cerebrex Ultimate
Cerebrex Ultimate is a serious educational videogame with the objective of improving the cognoscitive processes of players, specifically in the numeric, visuospatial, memory and rational areas. Players are faced with a variety of minigames which need to be completed in order to obtain materials, collectibles and virtual money. Materials can be used to obtain new equipment for the player’s avatar. The game uses high-end 2D graphics, music and thematic game elements to immerse the player in the Mayan culture.

Speakers
avatar for Hugo  Enriquez

Hugo Enriquez

Guatemala, Galileo University
Games and Learning, Game Design, Game Development, Gaming, Game Industry, JRPGs


Thursday August 18, 2016 11:30am - 4:30pm
Northwoods Union South

11:30am

Codemancer in the Showcasecase
Codemancer is a fantasy adventure about a young girl named Aurora, who must learn the ways of magic in order to rescue her Father from an evil Sorcereror. However, the way Magic works in Aurora's world is the same way that Programming works in ours. Codemancer is an educational game for 6-12 year-olds (especially girls) which teaches the magic of Code. \ \ An additional goal of the game is to be as broad and inclusive as possible. A gender-neutral fantasy setting, a female protagonist, a narrative backbone, and a language designed for accessibility; these are all ways to knock down barriers that prevent some kids from engaging with programming. When everybody is making technology, the technology they make will be for everybody. \ \ Codemancer will be available for Mac, PC and Tablets. We plan to Showcase the PC version at GLS.

Speakers
avatar for Robert  Lockhart

Robert Lockhart

Creative Director, Important Little Games
I'm an educational game designer and developer, currently working on "Codemancer," a game designed to teach programming through the fantastic story of a girl learning magic.


Thursday August 18, 2016 11:30am - 4:30pm
Northwoods Union South

11:30am

Community in Crisis
Community in Crisis is a literacy learning game that immerses students in an authentic workplace experience while learning literacy skills, engaging with meaningful texts, and developing 21st century life skills. Players take on the role as Director of Common Ground Community Center, a local organization responding to the effects of a major hurricane. As the Director, players must focus on providing services to the community with the help of their support staff by deciding how best to respond to daily challenges by making critical decisions based on information gathered through various sources in the game. As players navigate through the life of a working professional, they learn how to be critical thinkers, tackle real life problems, become strong decision makers and hone valuable literacy skills.

Speakers

Thursday August 18, 2016 11:30am - 4:30pm
Northwoods Union South

11:30am

FANSchool: think fantasy sports for learning
FANSchool is a fantasy sports-like platform for increasing engagement in world news and course content. Our “geopolitics” vertical started in our founder’s classroom to turn students into fans of interacting with current events and is now played by more than 1,000 paying schools throughout the U.S. and the world. Students draft teams of countries, become more aware, and get points every time their countries are mentioned in the news or make moves on a conflict-collaboration tone scale. A United States version of the game and a March Madness bracket-like challenge for the Electoral College will also be available in August for the 2016-17 school year.

Speakers
avatar for Eric Nelson

Eric Nelson

Co-Founder + CEO, FANschool
graduate of UW-Madison, former MN High School Social Studies Teacher, now Co-Founder of fanschool.org. | | We're obsessed with turning students into fans of learning through a fantasy-sports-like platform for school content + current events.


Thursday August 18, 2016 11:30am - 4:30pm
Northwoods Union South

11:30am

Geomoto
Geomoto is an embodied learning experience where players create geographic features by pulling, smashing, and grinding tectonic plates together. Players navigate around a planet devoid of geographic features with the express purpose of populating the planet with features of their own creation.

Speakers
avatar for Lucien Vattel

Lucien Vattel

CEO, GameDesk
Trailblazing education and game development visionary Lucien Vattel is at the forefront of a nationwide crusade to revolutionize learning in the classroom and beyond. As the CEO of the Los Angeles-based interactive curriculum creator and digital publisher GameDesk, Vattel is transforming the traditional school model into a hands-on, digitally-charged ecosystem for students to discover and nourish their greatest gifts, while embracing STEM... Read More →


Thursday August 18, 2016 11:30am - 4:30pm
Northwoods Union South

11:30am

GLS Showcasecase- Business Analytics Mobile Game
Magitech is a mobile fantasy game that helps players learn and hone the skills most valued in business world- analytics and problem-solving. By using magic spells and data charts, players will make critical production and trading decisions to compete with robots and maximize profits. Please check out our website at www.wrainbo.com and like us on facebook-www.facebook.com/magitechgame.

Speakers
avatar for Duke Wong

Duke Wong

CEO, Wrainbo
Passionate about business learning, data analytics, and video games!


Thursday August 18, 2016 11:30am - 4:30pm
Northwoods Union South

11:30am

Highlighting MazeStar: A Platform for Studying Avatar Use in Computer Science Learning Environments
MazeStar is a platform developed as part of a National Science Foundation-funded project researching effective uses of virtual identities in STEM learning environments. Contained in MazeStar is both a game (Mazzy) and an editor. In Mazzy, players solve maze-like levels by creating short computer programs. As levels become increasingly complex, players learn fundamental computing concepts such as code blocks, procedural thinking, looping, conditional statements, etc. In the level editor, players create custom maps with a high degree of customizability in terms of map size, map layout, and artwork. Mazzy has been used as a testbed for studying virtual identity in a STEM learning environment (Kao & Harrell, 2015a-e; 2016a-c), while the addition of the level editor will allow us to take new directions as we begin studying intersections of virtual identity, social identity, and education in the context of game play as game creation.

Speakers
avatar for Fox Harrell

Fox Harrell

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
D. Fox Harrell, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Digital Media in the Comparative Media Studies Program and the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at MIT. He founded and directs the MIT Imagination, Computation, and Expression Laboratory (ICE Lab). Harrell holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science and Cognitive Science from the University of California, San Diego. In 2010, he received a National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER... Read More →
SV

Sneha Veeragoudar Harrell

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
HH

Helen Ho

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
avatar for Dominic  Kao

Dominic Kao

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
CL

Chong-U Lim

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
MW

Maya Wagoner

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology


Thursday August 18, 2016 11:30am - 4:30pm
Northwoods Union South

11:30am

Invasion of the Energy Monsters: A Spooky Game About Saving Energy
We present a cooperative family board game called Invasion of the Energy Monsters designed to encourage entire families to reflect on how to use energy at home and to think about implications for global environmental sustainability. The premise of the game is that your home is being attacked by a menagerie of energy monsters, each personifying a different form of waste.The monsters start out weak but quickly grow stronger as they feast on your excess electricity usage. The energy heroes must band together and expel the monsters before it’s too late.

Speakers
AB

Amartya Banerjee

Evanston, Illinois, United States, Northwestern University
avatar for Michael Horn

Michael Horn

Evanston, Illinois, United States, Northwestern University
I'm an assistant professor at Northwestern University with a joint appointment in Computer Science and the Learning Sciences. I direct of the Tangible Interaction Design and Learning (TIDAL) Lab, and my research focuses on the intersection of human-computer interaction and learning with a focus on innovative and thoughtful uses of emerging technologies. Some of my recent research projects have included an investigation of multi-touch tabletops in... Read More →


Thursday August 18, 2016 11:30am - 4:30pm
Northwoods Union South

11:30am

JumpGym: An Exergame for Waiting Areas
Waiting in line can be a nuisance and a waste of time, but this doesn’t have to be the case. We present JumpGym, a multi-player exergame that explores the opportunity and time afforded by queues to occupy people with exercise and interactive play as they wait. We conducted testing with 75 participants to understand the effects of playing the game on a participant’s mood, perceived waiting time, exercise self-efficacy, and exercise awareness.

Speakers
MB

Maarten Bos

Disney Research
BD

Brianna Downs

Evanston, Illinois, United States, Northwestern University
JF

John Franklin

Evanston, Illinois, United States, Northwestern University
avatar for Emily  Harburg

Emily Harburg

Evanston, Illinois, United States, Northwestern University
avatar for Michael Horn

Michael Horn

Evanston, Illinois, United States, Northwestern University
I'm an assistant professor at Northwestern University with a joint appointment in Computer Science and the Learning Sciences. I direct of the Tangible Interaction Design and Learning (TIDAL) Lab, and my research focuses on the intersection of human-computer interaction and learning with a focus on innovative and thoughtful uses of emerging technologies. Some of my recent research projects have included an investigation of multi-touch tabletops in... Read More →
MO

Mmachi Obiorah

Evanston, Illinois, United States, Northwestern University
SY

Sean Ye

Evanston, Illinois, United States, Northwestern University


Thursday August 18, 2016 11:30am - 4:30pm
Northwoods Union South

11:30am

Learning Go with AlphaGo
Go is beloved throughout our world and times as an ocean of strategic play. However, relatively few people play, often citing difficulty in understanding the basic rules and strategy. To more moderately grade the learning curve, we have created an introduction to Go which marries instructional and game design with Monte Carlo artificial intelligence techniques to create a dynamic peer to peer-plus-one learning environment. We hope our introduction to Go can enable many more people to engage in its deep but creative problem-solving. This AI-enhanced learning environment also offers a model to consider for introducing other systems of rules and thought.

Speakers
WJ

William Jordan-Cooley

Instructional Designer, LearnPlay Games
Will is an Instructional Designer specializing in educational games. At BrainPOP, Will works on GameUp, a curated collection of over 100 educational games with K12 alignments and teacher support materials. | | Will obtained his M.A. in Instructional Technology and Media from Columbia University Teachers College, where he collaborated with Dr. Joey Lee, the Eggplant Games Lab and the NSF-funded POLAR research group on a... Read More →


Thursday August 18, 2016 11:30am - 4:30pm
Northwoods Union South

11:30am

Multiplier Maze: Grounding Fractions Knowledge in a Puzzle Game
Multiplier Maze is a puzzle game for PC designed to teach students about fractions through dynamic visual representations of magnitude that exemplify what it means to multiply by a fraction. In the game players must find a way through a maze by removing blocks on the path and escaping through narrow passageways. Players must strategically collect and use items that allow the player icon to grow larger and shrink smaller. Each item has two possible values: a whole number (e.g. 2) and it’s reciprocal (1/2). When using an item, the player choses between the two values and multiplies player icon’s width or height to shrink or grow proportionally. Unlike many math games with the goal of training the automation of fact retrieval, the design of the Multiplier Maze is aimed to support the conceptual learning of reciprocals, the multiplication of fractions as scaling, and the perceptual acuity of ratios.

Speakers
avatar for John Binzak

John Binzak

Research Project Assistant, Games+Learning+Society


Thursday August 18, 2016 11:30am - 4:30pm
Northwoods Union South

11:30am

River of Justice: Conflict Resolution in a Complex World
River of Justice is a 3D immersive game exploring the complexities of global conflict, ethical decision-making, and tensions between justice and forgiveness. Players take on the virtual role of an international agency representative in a fictionalized version of Uganda during the violent reign of the Lord’s Resistance Army. Suddenly finding themselves swept into the conflict, players are faced with ethical dilemmas that have both local and far-reaching consequences.

Speakers
avatar for Earl  Aguilera

Earl Aguilera

Graduate Research Assistant, Center for Games and Impact, ASU
literacy development in a digital age | the distributed nature of teaching and learning | game experiences as literacy events | re-designing schools for the 21st century | teacher education | high school teaching stories | coffee nerdery of all sorts | dungeons | dragons
avatar for Sasha Barab

Sasha Barab

Tempe, Arizona, USA, Arizona State University
My work involves the seamless integration of bounded games (where players can fail safely, receive embedded assessment, and have consequentiality in the confines of a fictional world) and larger, flexible 'meta-game' structures and affinity spaces that foster user-driven extensions and adaptations in support of real-world goals ad outcomes.


Thursday August 18, 2016 11:30am - 4:30pm
Northwoods Union South

11:30am

Soteria – Dreams as Currency
Soteria – Dreams as Currency (SDC) is a single-player, 3D adventure game designed to promote players’ readiness to use psycho-therapeutically proven strategies to overcome general anxiety disorder. Based on the research of Anxiety Treatment Center founder Prof. Reid Wilson, it serves to communicate principles of anxiety treatment in a way that enables experiential understanding. The design leverages “recursive learning” principles that subvert player expectations and initiate a “perspective switch” from avoiding to confronting anxiety. Taking the role of Ana, a young woman feeling trapped by her fears, the player aims to liberate Ana’s dreams from the evil entity, Oicys. The game is set in a metaphorical harbor town crawling with Shadow Creatures (representations of fears) and dedicated to the Goddess of Safety, Soteria. The first part of the game revolves around stealth mechanics. The second part changes to “lingering” through fear and provoking it through dialogue options. http://playforchange.cdm.depaul.edu/projects/soteria/ \

Speakers
avatar for Doris Rusch

Doris Rusch

Chicago, IL, USA, DePaul University
The human condition is extremely fascinating to me: what makes us tick? What's the spectrum of our emotions? How do we make sense of our experiences and share them with others? Games are a great medium to create shared experiences related to the human condition. One of my main areas of exploration related to that are mental health issues and the use of metaphors to make abstract ideas tangible. I made a few metaphorical games about addiction... Read More →


Thursday August 18, 2016 11:30am - 4:30pm
Northwoods Union South

11:30am

Take Off!
Created to teach basic numeracy skills to disadvantaged children in India, Take Off! blends addition and subtraction learning objectives with the convenience and accessibility of mobile gameplay for an empowering learning experience. Designed for equitable access on affordable devices, Take Off! engages players with a charming storyline and whimsical characters.

Speakers
KS

Kat Shanahan

Madison, WI, USA, Filament Games


Thursday August 18, 2016 11:30am - 4:30pm
Northwoods Union South

11:30am

The Da Vinci Coders: Teaching Programming with a Board Game
In today’s society programming has become a necessary skill— some may argue as important as reading or math. Yet, children are not typically introduced to the topic of computer science until high school or even college. Further, schools that do aim to introduce programming to children at younger ages cannot always do so because of a lack of technological resources and funding. To address this issue we designed a board game that aims to teach middle school children how to read and write Java code without the use of a computer. The game goes beyond teaching basic programming and problem solving techniques and actually introduces real syntax and code to the players. After several play tests with the target audience we have found that children not only enjoy playing the game but also can actually write syntactically correct Java code when tested after play.

Speakers
DC

Danny Capaccio

Oxford, Ohio, United States, Miami University
AC

Alyse Capaccio

Oxford, Ohio, United States, Miami University
avatar for Nora  Husani

Nora Husani

Software Engineering Graduate, Miami University
My name is Nora Husani and I recently graduated from Miami University with a Bachelor of Science in Software Engineering. I am really passionate about education and how we can leverage technology to improve learning. I am here to showcase my game "The Da Vinci Coders" which is an educational board game designed to teach middle school aged children how to program in Java.
LM

Lauren McKenzie

Oxford, Ohio, United States, Miami University
avatar for Bob De Schutter

Bob De Schutter

Oxford, Ohio, United States, Miami University
I'm a designer, researcher and teacher. My research interests are game design, the older audience of digital games, and the use of games for non-entertainment purposes.


Thursday August 18, 2016 11:30am - 4:30pm
Northwoods Union South

11:30am

The Fiscal Ship: A Game About the Federal Budget
In The Fiscal Ship, a player first chooses up to three governing goals from 10 choices we offer (e.g. reduce inequality, fight climate change, strengthen national defense, or shrink government, etc.). Then the player picks from ~100 tax and spending options (both increases and decreases) to achieve those goals and bring the debt-to-GDP ratio down from a projected 130% in 2041 to 75%, roughly where it is today. In other words, winning requires both achieving your governing goals and stabilizing the debt. The point: It is possible to stabilize the federal debt and pursue other objectives simultaneously, but it takes some hard decisions about taxes and spending to do so.

Speakers
EC

Eric Church

Serious Games Initiative - Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
avatar for Emilie  Saulnier

Emilie Saulnier

Troy, NY, United States, 1st Playable Productions
Tobi Saulnier, as Founder and CEO of 1st Playable Productions, leads a game development studio that has created such hit games such as Club Penguin for the Nintendo DS, Ben 10 DS, Disney Princess DS, and a number of other DS games designed for very specific demographics ("kids' games", "girls' games", etc). The studio is also known for innovative gameplay, including networked features, downloadable content, and integration of real and virtual... Read More →


Thursday August 18, 2016 11:30am - 4:30pm
Northwoods Union South

11:30am

The Science of Making an Astronomy Game: Discovery to Design
At Play in the Cosmos is an educational game built for introductory astronomy courses at the collegiate level through a collaboration between game developers and college professors. The game design reflects a general desire to teach quantitative concepts in a more graphical and intuitive manner to non-science students. The typical ASTR 101 student is not looking for a mathematically rigorous introduction to the discipline, but is keenly interested in black holes and constellations. Student expectations are often at odds with those of their professor who wants to introduce them to the incredible insights we have gained about the universe. Professors face the challenge of communicating quantitatively laden subject matter in a manner that does not threaten non-scientists. At Play in the Cosmos is an educational game designed to engage non-science majors by piquing their interest in our modern understanding of the Solar System, Stars, Galaxies, Black Holes, and the Universe.

Speakers
avatar for Mike Beall

Mike Beall

Project Leader, Learning Games Network
I am a Game Designer, Project Leader, and Artist working with the Learning Games Network and Games Learning Society. In addition to direct involvement with design and development of many GLS/LGN games, I also work with local schools and community centers where I engage with University of Wisconsin-Madison faculty and students to conduct playtests, interviews, and focus group tests.
avatar for Kurt Squire

Kurt Squire

Co-Director, Games+Learning+Society Center
Kurt Squire is a Professor of Digital Media in the Department of Curriculum & Instruction, and Co-Director of the Games+Learning+Society Center in the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery. Squire is the author or editor of three books, and over 75 scholarly publications on learning with technology. Squire has directed several game-based learning projects, ranging from ARIS, a tool for place-based mobile app development, to ProgenitorX, a game... Read More →


Thursday August 18, 2016 11:30am - 4:30pm
Northwoods Union South

11:30am

Trade to the top: Teaching economics and complex systems through the Lead Caravan multi-player game
Lead Caravan is an interactive, multiplayer mobile game that leverages the physical co-presence of participants. In Lead Caravan, you are an interstellar miner collecting resources at the far reaches of the galaxy. With nothing but a keen sense of business, you must outwit the other "space miners" to fulfill your order requests from back home. Use your keen negotiation skills to barter with other miners, and trade resources to gain advantage. But be careful... or another miner might out negotiate you and leave in their space dust!

Speakers
MB

Matthew Berland

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
avatar for Vishesh  Kumar

Vishesh Kumar

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
MT

Mike Tissenbaum

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison


Thursday August 18, 2016 11:30am - 4:30pm
Northwoods Union South

11:30am

Unsavory
Unsavory is a mobile game designed to put the player in the precarious position of choosing between their personal health, public health and their financial wellbeing. Like other activist games, the intention is to create awareness and empathy around an issue that is best understood as part of a larger system. Additionally, the game seeks to be a catalyst for change by embedding a social media campaign into gameplay that encourages players to share meaningful facts and statistics regarding restaurant workers, access to health care, and paid sick day legislation.

Speakers
avatar for Clayton Ewing

Clayton Ewing

Coral Gables, FL, USA, University of Miami
I'm an educator, developer and game designer.


Thursday August 18, 2016 11:30am - 4:30pm
Northwoods Union South

11:30am

VERBA™: Putting the _________ in Language Learning
VERBA™ is an exciting new card game from The Pericles Group, LLC designed to situate language learning in a richly-authentic, engaging context. The concept is incredibly simple: one player—acting as a judge—draws a random card containing a fill-in-the-blank sentence written in the target language, and each of the other players submits a card from their hand featuring a noun with an accompanying, context-relevant image. The judge chooses the best noun played (e.g., most realistic, funniest), and the player who submitted it scores a point. Play continues with the round’s winner serving as the new judge. As with all of The Pericles Group, LLC's educational games, play and learning objectives are one in the same—players win by directly enacting the desired skill without game mechanics obscuring the learning objective.

Speakers
avatar for Kevin Ballestrini

Kevin Ballestrini

Storrs, CT, US, The Pericles Group, LLC
Classics teacher at the Norwich Free Academy in Connecticut, instructional designer, and game designer. Co-founder of The Pericles Group.
avatar for Stephen Slota

Stephen Slota

Co-Founder, The Pericles Group, LLC
Steve (@steveslota) is an instructional design specialist and game design scientist at the University of Connecticut Health Center and a co-founder of The Pericles Group, LLC. He holds a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology: Cognition, Instruction, & Learning Technologies and has worked on a variety of game and instructional design projects with organizations including Arizona State University's Center for Games & Impact, Intel Corporation, and... Read More →
avatar for Roger Travis

Roger Travis

Storrs, CT, US, University of Connecticut, and The Pericles Group, LLC
Only connect: ancient epic to video games; teacher to student; gamer to gamer; fan to fan; parent to child; human being to human being.


Thursday August 18, 2016 11:30am - 4:30pm
Northwoods Union South

12:30pm

Lunch
Vegetarian and Gluten free options will be available

Thursday August 18, 2016 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Pavillion

2:00pm

Personalized Learning in Practice: Gaming Pedagogy in a Personalized Classroom
This Panel includes researchers, school leaders, digital media experts, and K-12 students to discuss how personalized learning school design and practice supports gaming and game design, both by classroom teachers and students. School leaders in these emerging spaces design for learning and fully embrace gaming as a useful tool and form of classroom pedagogy. Halverson, et. al (2015) explain, “In personalized learning, educators develop environments in which students and teachers together build plans for learners to achieve both interest-based and standards-based goals” (p. 1). Our Panel will discuss a key finding from a study on personalized learning: students are highly social and collaborative when gaming and using diverse digital learning tools in the classroom, which Halverson, et. al (2015) classify as a socio-technical environment (p. 3). Participants in the Panel will experience a personalized classroom game, Denouement, and are encouraged to engage and discuss openly (Johnson, 2016).

Speakers
avatar for Jill Gurtner

Jill Gurtner

Madison, WI, United States, Middleton-Cross Plains
I am passionate about creating engaging school environments in which every learner develops a deep understanding of self and the skills to thrive in our ever changing world filled with challenges and opportunities! I have been a school administrator for over 20 years and am constantly studying our systems to find ways to serve all learners better.
avatar for Sarah Hackett

Sarah Hackett

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
Sarah serves as a Network Fellows coordinator for the Wisconsin Collaborative Education Research Network (NetworkEd) (wcernetwork.org). She is also a full-time doctoral student at UW- Madison in Curriculum & Instruction - Digital Media. Previously, Sarah was a team member at the Innovative Schools Network (innovativeschoolsnetwork.com) and co-founded and taught at High Marq Environmental Charter School (highmarq.org). Sarah’s research... Read More →
avatar for Richard Halverson

Richard Halverson

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
I'm a Professor at UW-Madison, and I study how technologies can and do transform teaching and learning in and out of schools. I work with the Wisconsin Collaborative Education Research Network (the Network); the Collaborative Assessment of Leadership for Learning project, and the Games, Learning and Society Research Center.
BJ

Beau Johnson

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison


Thursday August 18, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Wisconsin Idea Union South

2:00pm

Why Teach Coding? A Friendly Debate
Coding is an incredibly popular subject in schools and in game-based learning. Right now there is an abundance of excellent apps and games for teaching programming for ages 4-18. Broadly speaking, these tools either use drag-and-drop ‘block programming’ or ask players to type script or code - approaches with very different goals and affordances often lost in the rush to "teach programming." \ \ In the spirit of “tastes great/less filling” we offer a debate between these different approaches that educational designers are taking to “teach coding”. Is the point to develop algorithmic thinking, to learn real languages, or to build something? Is it ‘better’ to start with blocks or jump right into text? Why is this so important in the first place? Join CodeMonkey, AllCanCode, and BrainPOP as they argue productively over something that they really agree on - and learn about practical pedagogical issues with STEM education along the way.

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Arpaci-Dusseau

Andrea Arpaci-Dusseau

Professor of Computer Sciences, UW-Madison
Dr. Andrea Arpaci-Dusseau is a Professor of Computer Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is an expert in file and storage systems, having published more than 80 papers in this area, co-advised nearly 20 Ph.D. students, and received nine best paper awards; for her research contributions, she was recognized as a UW-Madison Vilas Associate (2012-2014). Arpaci-Dusseau cares deeply about education and outreach; she served as... Read More →
YK

Yasmin Kafai

University of Pennsylvania
Yasmin Kafai is Professor of Learning Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania. She is a researcher, designer, and developer of online communities and tools (ecrafting.org, stitchtfest.org, and scratch.mit.edu) to promote computational participation, crafting, and creativity across K-16. Book publications include Connected Code, Connected Play, The Computer Clubhouse, Textile Messages, and Beyond Barbie and Mortal Kombat. Kafai earned a... Read More →


Thursday August 18, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Traditions Union South

2:00pm

ENVIRONMENTAL GAMES
Environmental Attitudes in Youth-created Computer Games about Climate Change
Puttick, Tucker-Raymond, & Barnes

This paper presents findings from case studies of two girls who designed games to teach other youth about climate change. Analysis of how their environmental attitudes shaped their design decisions offers a window on how these attributes of players were integral to the content and “look” of the games. Implications for creating game design experiences aimed at learning science, particularly when the topic is as difficult and complex as climate change, are discussed.

Invasion of the Energy Monsters: A Spooky Game About Saving Energy
Horn, Banerjee, Davis, Stevens

We present a cooperative family board game called Invasion of the Energy Monsters designed to encourage entire families to reflect on how to use energy at home and to think about implications for global environmental sustainability. After briefly reviewing related work, we outline our design principles, describe our game, and share preliminary findings from playtesting sessions with families in their homes.

Game-Based Learning for Identity Change
Foster, Shah & Barany

This study examined the extent to which a game, Land Science (LS), afforded identity change opportunities as defined by Projective Reflection (PR). PR served as a theoretical lens to analyze the design of LS and existing logged and intact data for 16 high school participants. Preliminary analyses indicated that LS met the intended design goals of supporting students’ knowledge gain for urban science and scientific modeling. Identity change was partially met as impacting students' content knowledge. LS did not afford opportunities for learners to explore multiple science identities, set personal goals within the learning environment, or establish personal relevance to game experiences. Hence, it was unclear whether participants valued the experience and content as personally significant to their future goals. Implications are discussed for advancing knowledge in the field about educational gaming for changing students' science identities.

Discussants
avatar for Kurt Squire

Kurt Squire

Co-Director, Games+Learning+Society Center
Kurt Squire is a Professor of Digital Media in the Department of Curriculum & Instruction, and Co-Director of the Games+Learning+Society Center in the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery. Squire is the author or editor of three books, and over 75 scholarly publications on learning with technology. Squire has directed several game-based learning projects, ranging from ARIS, a tool for place-based mobile app development, to ProgenitorX, a game... Read More →

Speakers
AB

Amartya Banerjee

Evanston, Illinois, United States, Northwestern University
avatar for Amanda Barany

Amanda Barany

Student Researcher, Drexel University
I am a graduate student in the school of Education at Drexel University with a focus on games as tools for interest, engagement, and identity development as immersive STEM career environments. I have experience with the GLS game Citizen Science, the Fair Play project at the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery, and interest and motivation research with the Harackiewicz research lab at UW Madison. Let's talk about games!
avatar for Jackie  Barnes

Jackie Barnes

Boston, Massachusetts, USA, Northeastern University
I've spent my years in grad school designing educational games, and my dissertation years looking into the diversity of user experience in a specific educational games. I want to keep designing, and to better understand how players see games differently, and whether they see educational games as "school" or "a real game."
PD

Pryce Davis

Evanston, Illinois, United States, Northwestern University
avatar for Aroutis  Foster

Aroutis Foster

Drexel University
avatar for Michael Horn

Michael Horn

Evanston, Illinois, United States, Northwestern University
I'm an assistant professor at Northwestern University with a joint appointment in Computer Science and the Learning Sciences. I direct of the Tangible Interaction Design and Learning (TIDAL) Lab, and my research focuses on the intersection of human-computer interaction and learning with a focus on innovative and thoughtful uses of emerging technologies. Some of my recent research projects have included an investigation of multi-touch tabletops in... Read More →
avatar for Gillian  Puttick

Gillian Puttick

TERC
Research on youth-created games to learn science, curriculum design about climate change for middle and/or high school
avatar for Mamta  Shah

Mamta Shah

Postdoctoral Scholar, Drexel University
Mamta Shah is a postdoctoral scholar of Learning Technologies in the School of Education at Drexel University in Philadelphia, PA. She teaches and conducts research on the theoretical and practical applications of teaching, learning, and assessing with digital environments such as games, in different settings including schools, workplaces, informal, and online environments. Ms. Shah’s professional work focuses on advancing our understanding... Read More →
RS

Reed Stevens

Evanston, Illinois, United States, Northwestern University
ET

Eli Tucker-Raymond

Educationist, TERC


Thursday August 18, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Agriculture Union South

2:00pm

LEARNING THRU MAKING GAMES
Making Design Activities Gameful Using a Role-Playing Card Game
Kim & Gupta

This paper presents our attempt at making a master’s level course on Digital Game-Based Learning (DGBL) gameful. The students were expected to propose design concepts for educational games at the end of the course while collaborating in groups. In our effort to make the design activities gameful, we created a role-playing card game for designing DGBL, which challenged the players to use various learning and design principles. Adopting Holden and colleagues’ (2014) conceptualization of gamefulness, we observed that learners Showcaseed a lusory attitude in designing DGBL when playing this card game. In this paper, we discuss our design of the course and the role-playing card game. We also argue that engaging in such a card game supports learners’ gameful learning based on preliminary findings from using the game in the classroom.

How Student Game Designers Design Learning into Games
Weitze

This investigation examined how to support students in creating learning designs for specific learning goals into analogue and digital games as a mean of learning. The study also explored what learning trajectories emerged in the students-learning-game-designers digital games. The DBR study was developed through three iterations over two years involving teachers and students in co-design processes. Together with the teachers an overall gamified learning design supported the learning process for students by inviting them to be their own learning designers through designing digital learning games for specific learning goals in cross-disciplinary subject matters. The findings were that the students succeeded in developing and implementing specific learning goals in their games. They also developed learning trajectories through the games by designing various learning and evaluation opportunities for the player/learner playing the game.

Computational Fluency as Argumentation Support in Scratch
Martin

In this paper I explore findings from an ethnography of the online Scratch community. Through the observations of the Scratch forums, I propose that computational thinking, which has been studied previously in Scratch, is used by Scratchers (i.e., people who participate on Scratch) as a way to strengthen arguments for topics about which Scratchers feel passionately. The analysis takes a social argumentation approach, which emphasizes context. The focus on context is important for a community like Scratch where the participants of the community feel strong connection and ownership over the activities and structure of community. This paper demonstrates how computational thinking can strengthen arguments, and what this does for Scratchers who use it.

Discussants
Speakers
DG

Diali Gupta

Calgary, Alberta, Canada, University of Calgary
BK

Beaumie Kim

Associate Professor, University of Calgary
Beaumie Kim is an associate professor and chair of the Learning Sciences at the Werklund School of Education. She worked previously at the Learning Sciences Group in Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, as well as NASA-sponsored Classroom of the Future program in Wheeling Jesuit University. Her research is focused on students' constructing their own understanding using gaming, modeling and visualization tools for learning. Her work is... Read More →
avatar for Crystle Martin

Crystle Martin

Researcher, University of California, Irvine
CL

Charlotte Lærke Weitze

Copenhagen, Danmark, Aalborg University


Thursday August 18, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Landmark Union South

2:00pm

Implementing and Evaluating a District-wide Game-based Learning Program
In the second year of implementation, a Wisconsin school district’s administrators are using student feedback, teacher experiences, and data analytics to expand and refine their game-based learning program. Join district administrators, educators, and their game-based learning partner for a behind-the-scenes look at the district-wide implementation process, including the administration's criteria for selecting a program, the challenges they encountered along the way, and the assessment measures that were put into place.

Speakers
avatar for Marshall Behringer

Marshall Behringer

Madison, WI, USA, Filament Games
Marshall is the Community Development & Outreach Specialist at Filament Games. A former educator, he grows and engages with the community of educators and classrooms that Filament works with on a regular basis. He directs user testing and advocates for teacher and learner needs as Filament designs and develops their learning games.
avatar for Nathan Grundahl

Nathan Grundahl

Technology Integrator, Sun Prairie School District
Nathan is a Technology Integrator at Sun Prairie Area School District. As a technology Integrator, he has effectively led a 1:1 chromebook initiative, professional development for teachers, and coached teachers on implementing technology in the classroom. A classroom teacher for 8 years, during that time he developed blogs, student portfolio websites, oral history projects along with many more digitally engaging activities. He is also Google... Read More →
MH

Mary Headington

Teacher, Sun Prairie School District
I will be starting a 1:1 classroom this fall with chrome books.
avatar for Anne Larson

Anne Larson

Digital Learning Manager, Sun Prairie School District
Anne is the digital learning manager for the Sun Prairie Area School District and works to integrate technology into instruction while working side-by-side with district leaders, building leaders, teachers, and students. Anne’s passion for education and technology has focused on elementary education as a classroom teacher, interventionist, and teacher trainer overseas. Gaming has always been a source of relaxation and learning, beginning with... Read More →


Thursday August 18, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Fifth Quarter Studio Union South

2:00pm

Toward a Feminist Method for Game Design with State of Decay
Abstract: If (intersectional) feminist research seeks knowledge meant to break boundaries and is committed to knowledge opposing injustice in all spheres, then a feminist approach to game design should similarly seek to produce a material representation of opposition. Undead Labs’ 2013 game State of Decay, while an imperfectly feminist game, blazes a path for console games in this intersectional approach to design, moving a game positioned in a traditionally masculine space forward into something more inclusive, and more representative of feminist methods. Within this Well Played, all three available modes of State of Decay will be explored from a feminist critical lens, by meshing with New Materialist frameworks, feminist methods, and Sicart’s notions of the disruption of play to examine what Undead Labs did to shake up console gaming with both the original release of State of Decay and further with additions included in the Year One Survival Edition. \

Speakers

Thursday August 18, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Marquee Union South

2:00pm

Committee of N: A Card Game for School (Re-)Design
Committee of N is a collaborative, design-based card game where players create new kinds of schools based on design constraints implemented through random card draws. In the core game play, players are randomly assigned educational values (e.g. belief in multiple intelligences or achievement on high-stakes tests) from a deck along with a specific school element (bell schedule, graduation requirements, etc.), and they then creatively design the element to reflect their defined values. By using cards as context for discussion and research, undergraduate education students and practicing educators become animated about the possibilities of designing and imagining the school they would most like to teach in. In this workshop, we will present the game and pilot findings before exploring possibilities for expanding this game into professional development and beyond.

Speakers
CF

Caitlin Feeley

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
avatar for Jason Haas

Jason Haas

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Jason is a Research Assistant and PhD candidate in The Education Arcade and the Center for Mobile Learning in the MIT Media Lab. He is also an Early Career Scholar at the Harvard Graduate School of Education in the Spencer New Civics Education Program.His research focuses on designing interesting civic, multiplayer experiences (for learning and otherwise) and evaluating them in context. Recent work includes the Jigsaw-based iPad game SANCTUARY... Read More →
EK

Eric Klopfer

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Dr. Eric Klopfer is Professor and Director of the Scheller Teacher Education Program and The Education Arcade at MIT. Klopfer’s research focuses on the development and use of computer games and simulations for building understanding of science and complex systems. His research explores simulations and games on desktop computers as well as mobile devices like smartphones and tablets. Klopfer’s work combines the construction of new software... Read More →
avatar for Justin Reich

Justin Reich

Research Scientist, Teaching Systems Lab at MIT


Thursday August 18, 2016 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Industry Union South

3:30pm

Creating Learning Experiences for the Playful Classroom
This Panel brings together practitioners to discuss the unique challenges and opportunities in creating playful learning experiences for the classroom. Participants from BrainPOP, Cracking Wise Interactive, Classroom, Inc., Curriculum Associates, and Teachley will share their approaches to bringing games and other playful experiences into schools, both from a pedagogical and a practical point of view.

Speakers
avatar for Kathy Yu Burek

Kathy Yu Burek

New York, NY, United States, Classroom, Inc.
avatar for Kara  Carpenter

Kara Carpenter

Cofounder, Teachley
Kara Carpenter, PhD is Cofounder of Teachley, an edtech startup giving elementary schools formative assessment data from games. She is a National Board Certified Teacher with over 10 years of experience teaching children of all ages as a classroom teacher, outdoor education instructor and Peace Corps Volunteer. She has a PhD in Cognition and Learning from Columbia University with a research focus on teaching and detecting math strategies via... Read More →
avatar for Allisyn Levy

Allisyn Levy

VP, GameUp, BrainPOP
Since joining BrainPOP in 2007, Allisyn Levy has played an integral role in the creation, launch, and continued development of BrainPOP Educators, our online professional community. Now, as Vice President, GameUp, she leads outreach efforts for BrainPOP's online learning games portal, a collection of top, cross-curricular game titles from leading game creators. Allisyn is a National Board Certified Teacher who spent 11 years as an elementary... Read More →
avatar for Anne  Richards

Anne Richards

Founder and Creative Director, Cracking Wise Interactive
games, design, education, narrative, technology
CZ

Christine Zanchi

Curriculum Associates


Thursday August 18, 2016 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Wisconsin Idea Union South

3:30pm

What Buffy the Vampire Slayer Has To Teach Us About Gaming, Education, and Self-directed Learning
Buffy the Vampire Slayer (BtVS) is a teen horror television series that aired from 1997-2003. It was notable for its twist on the horror genre, making the scared girl in the alley, the hero that kills monsters. BtVS was also notable for its portrayal of and focus on the student experience and education. \ \ Game-based learning has similar connections to education and pop-culture. Many of the themes addressed in BtVS are frequently reflected in games-based learning literature. The Panel will discuss gaming, education, and lifelong learning framed by themes identified in Buffyverse literature, topics will include: \ •Games that reinforce or subvert the student-teacher relationship \ •Games and learning in the wild and "dangerous” knowledge \ •Games to train, games to learn, & the implicit politics of design. \ •Games that provide player agency while still supporting learning objectives. \ •Do games provide an existential reframe of education and learning?

Speakers
avatar for Reid Adams

Reid Adams

Director of Simulation Ops., DeVry Medical International's Institute for Research and Clinical Strategy
Reid Adams is Associate Director for the DeVry, Inc. Center for Excellence in Simulation Education and The Simulation Operations Specialist at the St. Joseph Mercy Oakland – Clinical Simulation Education Research Center. He has worked extensively in simulation with multiple healthcare disciplines at various levels of training, ranging from under graduate to practicing clinician. Reid’s previously work at the Ross University School of Medicine... Read More →
EB

Eric Bauman

Iselen, New Jersey, United States, DeVry Medical International's Institute for Research and Clinical Strategy
avatar for Benjamin DeVane

Benjamin DeVane

Iowa City, Iowa, United States, University of Iowa
Identity & Learning | Computational Thinking | Design & Aesthetics
avatar for Crystle Martin

Crystle Martin

Researcher, University of California, Irvine
AS

Angela Samosorn

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
avatar for Moses Wolfenstein

Moses Wolfenstein

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin, Extension
Moses has worked in the field of education for over a decade, and has been studying and creating games and other digital media for learning since 2006. He holds a PhD from the University of Wisconsin–Madison in Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis where he worked with his adviser Rich Halverson on games for school leadership. As SeniorInteraction Developer at University of Wisconsin-Extension, Moses works to improve user experiences and... Read More →


Thursday August 18, 2016 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Traditions Union South

3:30pm

AESTHETICS
How Music Affects Learning in a 3D Gaming Environment: An Experiment
Sittler

This study examined the effects of music, in a 3D gaming environment, on educational achievement as measured by a series of criterion-referenced tests (identification, terminology, and comprehension). A sample of 81 undergraduate students from a [institution] were recruited to take part in the experiment and then randomly assigned to one of three groups that each played a short educational game module about the human heart. Each group played an identical module save for the fact that one contained no music, one module played Mozart, and another allowed participants to self-select the music they would receive. They then each took a series of identical tests to ascertain performance. Results are discussed herein.

Critical Thinking With Aesthetic Elements of Minecraft
Gupta & Kim

This paper presents on how interactions with aesthetic elements of digital games (Minecraft) help foster critical thinking skills. We argue that interactions with aesthetic elements of games enable aesthetic experiences facilitating holistic understanding and critical thinking towards the problem. Using a unique theoretical framework for visualization of aesthetics of digital games, we have analyzed how learners in an arts immersive school in Canada have interpreted and interacted with the aesthetic elements of Minecraft. Our analysis delves into their construction of meaning and critical thinking skills at work. Specifically, we have considered the aesthetical elements of geography and representation of Minecraft. Minecraft is unique in the sense that the geography and representations are user generated. Hence we have focused on how learners have interacted and interpreted these aesthetic elements based on the content and how the process of creating these elements have triggered their critical thinking skills.

Exploring the Effects of Dynamic Avatar on Performance and Engagement in Educational Games
Kao & Harrell

Avatar research has almost exclusively explored avatar that are the same regardless of context. But a plethora of work has Showcasen that avatars personalized in one’s likeness increases identification. Contrarily, avatars more like objects increase detachment. We posit that in certain situations within a game it may be more advantageous to have increased identification, and in other situations increased detachment. We present the first study on dynamic avatar, or avatar that change types via game context. We investigate the successful-likeness, an avatar that is only a likeness when the player is in a win state, and at all other times an object. Our experiment (N=997) compares four avatars: 1) Shape, 2) Likeness, 3) Likeness-to-Shape, and 4) Shape-to-Likeness (successful-likeness). Players using a successful-likeness had significantly better performance (levels completed), and played significantly longer (minutes played). As performance and engagement are correlated to learning, successful-likeness avatars may be crucial in educational games.

Discussants
Speakers
DG

Diali Gupta

Calgary, Alberta, Canada, University of Calgary
avatar for Fox Harrell

Fox Harrell

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
D. Fox Harrell, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Digital Media in the Comparative Media Studies Program and the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at MIT. He founded and directs the MIT Imagination, Computation, and Expression Laboratory (ICE Lab). Harrell holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science and Cognitive Science from the University of California, San Diego. In 2010, he received a National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER... Read More →
avatar for Dominic  Kao

Dominic Kao

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
BK

Beaumie Kim

Associate Professor, University of Calgary
Beaumie Kim is an associate professor and chair of the Learning Sciences at the Werklund School of Education. She worked previously at the Learning Sciences Group in Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, as well as NASA-sponsored Classroom of the Future program in Wheeling Jesuit University. Her research is focused on students' constructing their own understanding using gaming, modeling and visualization tools for learning. Her work is... Read More →
avatar for Ryan  L. Sittler

Ryan L. Sittler

Assistant Professor, California University of Pennsylvania
I have a Ph.D. in Communications Media and Instructional Technology and enjoy exploring opportunities for instructional design and game design to cross paths. (Particularly if music or information literacy are involved). I've worked on a few educational game projects--even winning an award for "A Planet in Peril: Plagiarism" in 2010 (I led design)--and regularly publish in the field of library science. Though I'm now looking for more... Read More →


Thursday August 18, 2016 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Agriculture Union South

3:30pm

ENGAGEMENT
I Choose…This One! Exploring Student Motivation in Response to Assignment Choice
Plummer, Holman, & Fishman

Giving students choices regarding their work is a core principle of gameful course design. Increasing autonomy should support intrinsic motivation, and enable students to increase their competence by creating a safe context in which to try new and challenging tasks. We analyzed the implementation of assignment choice in three large undergraduate gameful courses. Each course featured a different style and degree of support for student autonomy, and these variations related to differences observed in student attitudes. Students’ answers on open-response survey questions shed light on the underlying reasons for these differences. We discuss the implications of our findings and identify next steps to guide the design of gameful courses.

From “So Cool” to “I’m Bored:” Longitudinal Trends in Activity Monitors and Gaming
Hagood & Ching

To integrate gaming and physical activity among youth (ages 13 and 14), activity monitors were used to track 42 participants’ physical activity throughout the day and in-turn integrate activity information into a virtual game world. In this analysis of fitbit log data, random-effects growth curve analyses are used to model the general activity trend. A two-phase model is introduced that explores how activity changes before versus after the game is introduced. This quantitative analysis of activity trends is interpreted using extensive participant interviews. The paper concludes by making the case that game and physical data analytics necessitate compatible qualitative research designs.

Tenacious Assessments: Using In-Game Behaviors to Measure Student Persistence and Challenge Navigation
Malkiewich, Lee, Slater, Chase

Game log data provides a unique opportunity to study student gaming behavior, and how it relates to learning. Behaviors that are particularly interesting include how students persist and navigate challenges in an educational game context. Literature has investigated embedded assessments for learning in games, but there is less work on measuring student persistence and challenge approach and response behaviors, specifically in games. This paper explores a variety of student persistence and challenge navigation measures based on student in-game behaviors taken from log data. Some measures are highly correlated with student learning from the game, and a classical measure of student persistence. Results suggest new ways of measuring students’ motivational behaviors in games provide much more fine-grained data than traditional assessments of motivation and can be used to assess positive student learning behaviors during gameplay.

Discussants
RS

Reed Stevens

Evanston, Illinois, United States, Northwestern University

Speakers
CC

Catherine C. Chase

New York, NY, United States, Teachers College Columbia University
avatar for Cynthia Ching

Cynthia Ching

Associate Professor of Learning and Mind Sciences, University of California, Davis
Technology and identity, personal data gaming, embodied cognition, games and behavior.
avatar for Barry Fishman

Barry Fishman

Ann Arbor, MI, United States of America, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Gameful learning, GradeCraft, motivation, higher education
avatar for Danielle Hagood

Danielle Hagood

PhD Student, University of California, Davis
CH

Caitlin Holman

Ann Arbor, MI, United States of America, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
AL

Alison Lee

New York, NY, United States, Classroom, Inc.
LM

Laura Malkiewich

New York, NY, United States, Teachers College Columbia University
avatar for Benjamin  Plummer

Benjamin Plummer

Ann Arbor, MI, United States of America, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
SS

Stefan Slater

New York, NY, United States, Teachers College Columbia University


Thursday August 18, 2016 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Fifth Quarter Studio Union South

3:30pm

SUPPORTING DISABILITIES
Do you see what I see? Visual Attention Patterns of Adolescents with and without ASD to a Dynamic Videogame Stimulus
Finke, Hickerson, & Wilkinson

The purpose of this study was to determine if children with and without autism spectrum disorder (ASD) fixate similarly while passively viewing a videogame play stimulus. To answer this research question, eye-tracking technology (i.e., Tobii T60) was used to gather data from typically developing children as well as children with ASD. A coding scheme was developed to determine how often all participants visually attended to various elements of the video game. This study is a first step in determining if videogame play may be an appropriate context for providing opportunities for friendship formation.

Who Benefited Most from Game-Based Learning in Special Education Settings?
Kwon

In this study, we compared special education students based on their functioning levels and gender in order to investigate who benefited the most from game-based learning. The results indicated that the low-functioning group improved significantly in both speed and accuracy when compared to the no-game group. Further, the boys’ group increased considerably in speed only while the girls’ group did not Showcase a significant difference between the game group and the control group. The implications of this study are discussed in greater detail.

Hello, World: Building Accessibility in Game Design
Jen Dalsen

There are roughly 6.4 million students with disabilities in special education services. These students vary in disability type, learning preferences and educational needs. For many, games-based learning and educational apps awaken untapped abilities. More schools, recognizing technology as a tool for learning, are rapidly adopting tablets, computers and other devices into the classroom setting. But what does access truly mean? The purpose of this session is to deconstruct the word ‘access’ in game design. In particular, how principles of universal design for learning can be applied at the forefront of game development. I close with a look at how front loading design to accommodate learners of diverse needs will ultimately benefit user and developer alike.

Discussants
avatar for Jill Gurtner

Jill Gurtner

Madison, WI, United States, Middleton-Cross Plains
I am passionate about creating engaging school environments in which every learner develops a deep understanding of self and the skills to thrive in our ever changing world filled with challenges and opportunities! I have been a school administrator for over 20 years and am constantly studying our systems to find ways to serve all learners better.

Speakers
JD

Jennifer Dalsen

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
I am a doctoral student in the Curriculum & Instruction Department at UW-Madison. My research focuses on: digital access and looking at how students with disabilities learn through technological supports. I am an active collaborator with the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI) on UDL.
EF

Erinn Finke

University Park, PA, USA, Penn State University
BH

Benjamin Hickerson

University of North Carolina Greensboro
avatar for Jungmin  Kwon

Jungmin Kwon

Associate Professor, Seoul National University of Education
I am a professor in Early Childhood & Special Education at the Seoul National Univ. of Education in Korea. I am also a graduate of UW-Madison with M.S. degree from Curriculum &Instruction and Ph.D. from Rehab Psych and Special Ed. My research interest includes: game-based learning & training, assistive technology, HCI, HRI, and UX. In my presentation, I will show the games that I developed to teach students with disabilities in school... Read More →
KW

Krista Wilkinson

University Park, PA, USA, Penn State University


Thursday August 18, 2016 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Landmark Union South

3:30pm

Well Played: Clash Royale, A Casual Deck-Building Battle Arena for Parents and Kids to Battle and Build
Clash Royale is a casual mobile deck-building battle arena game. The mashup of these genres has created a game with appeal to different kinds of players, and also promotes productive interactions between different kinds of players, making for interesting family game play for “hard core” players and those less so.

Speakers
EK

Eric Klopfer

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Dr. Eric Klopfer is Professor and Director of the Scheller Teacher Education Program and The Education Arcade at MIT. Klopfer’s research focuses on the development and use of computer games and simulations for building understanding of science and complex systems. His research explores simulations and games on desktop computers as well as mobile devices like smartphones and tablets. Klopfer’s work combines the construction of new software... Read More →
MK

Maya Klopfer

Lynch Elementary School
OK

Oren Klopfer

McCall Middle School


Thursday August 18, 2016 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Marquee Union South

3:30pm

Publish Mobile-Ready Narrative Games with the Playable Media Story Builder
Hands-on demo of the Playable Media Story Builder, a free and open source game engine to quickly build and publish responsive narrative games. Workshop participants will learn an approach to rapidly developing narrative games with the Story Builder through modding an existing game in the engine, iterating on game mechanics to affect the experience and message of a game.

Speakers
avatar for Retha Hill

Retha Hill

Tempe, Arizona, USA, Arizona State University
Retha Hill is the executive director of the New Media Innovation and Entrepreneurship Lab at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University. The Lab’s journalism and computer science majors create innovative products, including Web applications, social media tools and mobile apps for media clients. On the entrepreneurship side of the Lab, students create their own media companies and products... Read More →
avatar for Juli  James

Juli James

Lecturer, Applied Design + News Games, University of North Texas



Thursday August 18, 2016 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Industry Union South

5:00pm

DeVry Marquee Dinner
Sponsored by DeVry Medical International’s Institute for Research & Clinical Strategy


Thursday August 18, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Sun Garden

7:00pm

GLS Showcase Ceremony
Featuring desserts and drinks!

Speakers
avatar for Dennis Ramirez

Dennis Ramirez

Technical Director, USC IMGD, Videogame Researcher


Thursday August 18, 2016 7:00pm - 8:00pm
Marquee Union South

8:00pm

Arcade & Games Tournament
Have some time to kill before the next talk? Come check out the GLS Arcade where we'll have all the newest gen consoles, complete with a huge stack of great games; a Dance and Jam games section to get you moving; a PC section for your Hearthstone or League of Legends fix; and (new to GLS) a Virtual Reality section including multiple Occulus DK2 and HTC Vive! Is there any better way to get to know your fellow game scholars, developers, and enthusiasts?

GLS is excited to announce the first ever Games Tournaments to be held  throughout the conference! Come test your game skills against other game scholars, developers, and enthusiasts! Prizes and glory await the winners! Stay tuned for details on the games you'll be playing and what you will walking away with when you prove victorious!

There are rolling high-scores for Guitar Hero, DDR, and Forza. People can play these at any time and have a volunteer record their highscore.

Bracket tournament games for Thursday evening: Smash Bros Brawl, Smash Bros WiiU, Mortal Kombat X, Splatoon, Halo, and Johan Sabastien Joust. These each have a sign up sheet that I will randomly place people into brackets from. Walk-ins welcome.  

Thursday August 18, 2016 8:00pm - 10:00pm
Northwoods Union South

8:00pm

Filament Games GLS Soiree
You're invited to the 2016 GLS After Party at Filament Games! The evening's festivities will bring together the finest minds in game-based learning for networking, refreshments, merriment, and yes, games. We look forward to seeing you there!

Free shuttle provided from Union South to Filament Games from the round about between Union South and Computer Sciences (see attached photo)

RSVP here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/gls-2016-soiree-tickets-26669891363

Speakers


Thursday August 18, 2016 8:00pm - 11:30pm
FIlament Games Headquarters 316 W Washington Ave Suite 1000, Madison, WI 53703
 
Friday, August 19
 

9:30am

Coffee & Pastries
Freshly brewed Madison based Steep & Brew regular and decaf coffee, hot water and assorted herbal and regular teas, with bakery items such as bagels with cream cheese, croissants, assorted muffins, banana nut bread, and Hawaiian mango bread.

Gluten free pasteries available, please indicate dietary restrictions on registration form.

Friday August 19, 2016 9:30am - 10:00am
Marquee Union South

10:00am

Keynote
Speakers
avatar for Gordon Bellamy

Gordon Bellamy

USC
I value connecting good people. I love when people aim high. Occasionally, I will have a very clever turn of phrase. I tweet @gordonbellamy

Opening Words
CK

Craig Kettelson

Enterprise Development Director at Madison Region Economic Partnership (Mad REP)


Friday August 19, 2016 10:00am - 11:00am
Marquee Union South

11:00am

Arcade
Have some time to kill before the next talk? Come check out the GLS Arcade where we'll have all the newest gen consoles, complete with a huge stack of great games; a Dance and Jam games section to get you moving; a PC section for your Hearthstone or League of Legends fix; and (new to GLS) a Virtual Reality section including multiple Occulus DK2 and HTC Vive! Is there any better way to get to know your fellow game scholars, developers, and enthusiasts?

Discussants
avatar for Craig G.  Anderson

Craig G. Anderson

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
Current doctoral student in digital media focusing on how games create and keep cognitive engagement. | | Upload/Download captain GLS 2015/2016: Ask me about the arcade!

Friday August 19, 2016 11:00am - 5:00pm
Northwoods Union South

11:30am

Guiding Through Game-Based Implementations Without Getting A Game Over
Educators, scholars, and other stakeholders are implementing games with increasing frequency in a variety of learning contexts. Each of these contexts has unique affordances and constraints. Navigating and mastering any game-based implementation requires intensive planning, iterative problem solving, and willingness to compromise. This Panel brings together educators and scholars with experience implementing games in a variety of different contexts: in underserved high schools, classrooms on a limited budget, libraries, museums, and a week-long games camp. Each Panelist will describe a unique game-based implementation that they oversaw—addressing what worked, what was surprising, and lessons learned from failures. We invite audience members to seek answers to questions they have about designing, adapting, and optimizing their own game-based implementations.

Speakers
avatar for Craig G.  Anderson

Craig G. Anderson

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
Current doctoral student in digital media focusing on how games create and keep cognitive engagement. | | Upload/Download captain GLS 2015/2016: Ask me about the arcade!
avatar for Seann Dikkers

Seann Dikkers

Education Department Chair, Bethel University
Seann Dikkers is an associate professor of Education at Bethel University. Formerly, Seann served fourteen years as a middle school teacher, high school principal, and researcher. Now he teaches, writes, and works with some amazing colleagues at Bethel. He studies exemplary teaching, learning design, and learning systems. His books include *Real-Time Research*, *Mobile Media Learning I and II*, and *TeacherCraft: Minecraft in the Classroom... Read More →
HJ

Hannah Jaris

Senior Coordinator, American Museum of Natural History
avatar for Crystle Martin

Crystle Martin

Researcher, University of California, Irvine
avatar for Amanda Ochsner

Amanda Ochsner

Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Southern California


Friday August 19, 2016 11:30am - 12:30pm
Wisconsin Idea Union South

11:30am

The Great Dragon Swooping Cough: Stories about Learning Designs in Promoting Participation and Engagement with a Virtual Epidemic
In Winter 2016 the great Dragon Swooping Cough entered the virtual world of Whyville, wreaking chaos with scales, swooping, and great annoyance. In this Panel we share first findings from this engaging and educational epidemic: industry designers, educational researchers, and professional epidemiologists joined together to work to release a virus in a virtual world for kids, promoting experience and engagement with infectious disease. How was the virus designed to create the greatest possible engagement from citizens? What forms of participation and prevention could citizens engage in? What worked educationally? What failed? In the end we invite audience members to reflect on how the virus performed and what could be improved in future iterations. We also engage audience members in a conference-wide epidemic game (the GLS Sneeze), simulating experiences of epidemic outbreaks in the virtual world.

Speakers
avatar for Benjamin DeVane

Benjamin DeVane

Iowa City, Iowa, United States, University of Iowa
Identity & Learning | Computational Thinking | Design & Aesthetics
avatar for Estee  Ellis

Estee Ellis

University of Pennsylvania
NF

Nina Fefferman

Rutgers University
DF

Deborah Fields

Research Consultant + Assistant Professor, Utah State University
Dr. Deborah A. Fields is a Temporary Assistant Professor in Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences at Utah State University and an independent research consultant. Deborah researches children’s connective learning and identity engagement through designing with digital technologies in ways that bridge informal and formal learning contexts. She is the co-PI on the Kids' DIY Media Project (kidsdiymedia.com) aimed at identifying and... Read More →
YK

Yasmin Kafai

University of Pennsylvania
Yasmin Kafai is Professor of Learning Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania. She is a researcher, designer, and developer of online communities and tools (ecrafting.org, stitchtfest.org, and scratch.mit.edu) to promote computational participation, crafting, and creativity across K-16. Book publications include Connected Code, Connected Play, The Computer Clubhouse, Textile Messages, and Beyond Barbie and Mortal Kombat. Kafai earned a... Read More →
JS

Jen Sun

Numedeon, Inc.


Friday August 19, 2016 11:30am - 12:30pm
Traditions Union South

11:30am

GAMES IN THE RIGHT FRAME
Inciting out-of-game transfer: Adapting contrast-based instruction for educational games
Chase, Harpstead, Aleven

We adapted a successful instructional principle – contrasting cases – to create an educational game to teach young children physical principles of stability. Our goal was to design a game that would effect transfer - extending the reach of the educational game beyond the game itself. In Study 1, we compared a “standard” version of the game to a “contrast” version that contained contrasting case levels designed to help learners notice the principles underlying game content. In Study 2, we augmented the contrast version of the game with induction levels that focused learners on abstracting general principles from sets of contrasting cases. In both studies, we found that contrast versions of the game facilitated transfer, while standard versions did not. Students found contrast versions of the game highly enjoyable, just as enjoyable as the standard game. Findings have implications for the design of educational games that are instructive yet fun.

How'd That Happen?! Failure in Game Spaces to Prepare Students for Future Learning
Lee, Liu, Jullamon & Black

Educational games can be used effectively in the classroom, because exploration and responses to failure in game spaces can afford productive metacognition that better prepares students for future learning (PFL). In our study, we explored how the role of failure-induced metacognitive appraisal and strategy selection while playing a physics game better prepares students for learning from formal content after gameplay. Our results indicate that experiencing failure to prepare students for future learning can elicit more complex and robust mental representations of a complicated science system. However, experiencing failure unto itself isn’t sufficient for improving general conceptual understanding - a good metacognitive response is required. Further investigation identified response to failure with info-seeking, then fixing one’s answer was found significantly related to learning because it entails an appraisal of knowledge gaps, resolving such gaps through info-seeking, and apply newly acquired information to address prior misconceptions.

When is a Game Not a Game? Considering Player Perceptions of An Educational Game
Barnes & Harteveld
Educational games are designed with playful affordances, yet have the serious purpose of supporting players’ learning. Given this, how players perceive these activities may influence how they interact with them, and therefore, whether they actually learn from them. Case studies are presented here from an educational game teaching Newtonian physics to better understand the relationships between player perceptions and the nature of their game experiences, in terms of reality, meaning, and play. The findings we present indicate that players’ perceptions of educational game affordances as academic or playful contribute to divergent experiences with the same design.


Discussants
avatar for Richard Halverson

Richard Halverson

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
I'm a Professor at UW-Madison, and I study how technologies can and do transform teaching and learning in and out of schools. I work with the Wisconsin Collaborative Education Research Network (the Network); the Collaborative Assessment of Leadership for Learning project, and the Games, Learning and Society Research Center.

Speakers
VA

Vincent Aleven

Pittsburgh, PA, USA, Carnegie Mellon University
avatar for Jackie  Barnes

Jackie Barnes

Boston, Massachusetts, USA, Northeastern University
I've spent my years in grad school designing educational games, and my dissertation years looking into the diversity of user experience in a specific educational games. I want to keep designing, and to better understand how players see games differently, and whether they see educational games as "school" or "a real game."
JB

John Black

New York, NY, United States, Teachers College Columbia University
CC

Catherine C. Chase

New York, NY, United States, Teachers College Columbia University
avatar for Erik Harpstead

Erik Harpstead

Pittsburgh, PA, USA, Carnegie Mellon University
avatar for Casper Harteveld

Casper Harteveld

Boston, Massachusetts, USA, Northeastern University
Dr. Casper Harteveld is an Assistant Professor of Game Design at Northeastern University, and author of Triadic Game Design (Springer, 2011), a book about serious game design. He earned his PhD degree from Delft University of Technology in Systems Engineering, Policy Analysis & Management. His research focuses on using games to learn about decision-making, and educating people in making better decisions through games. He applies this especially... Read More →
MJ

Mathurada Jullamon

New York, NY, United States, Teachers College Columbia University
AL

Alison Lee

New York, NY, United States, Classroom, Inc.
CL

Connie Liu

New York, NY, United States, Teachers College Columbia University


Friday August 19, 2016 11:30am - 12:30pm
Landmark Union South

11:30am

REVIEW
Gamification, Digital Game-Based Learning and Serious Games a Critical Literature Review
Ly

Over the last two decades gamification, digital game-based learning and serious games are areas that have been widely researched. In spite of this the literature on gamification, serious games and digital game-based learning indicates a high degree of disagreement on the definitions for these aforementioned terms. This paper aims to tackle this issue by placing such terms on a continuum which illustrates the degree of overlap which exists between gamification, serious games and entertainment games. Following this, the researcher will observe how the continuum works in practice. More specifically, previously existing research conducted by the author(s) on browser and native applications for the Bring your own Device (BYOD) classroom will be applied to the continuum. Such applications will be assessed for their “gamefulness”, thereby confirming the relevance of this continuum.

How a history of racing games can inform contemporary game design education
Nunez

Racing games are one of the simplest genres of games that are used to teach fundamental game design to beginners. Contemporary examples of the genre can serve to model concepts of the systemic design of games, but are often poor examples of how games can embody values and meaning. However, an examination of the history of racing games reveals that these games were traditionally designed to address a wide array of humanistic, societal and cultural concepts. Rediscovering this history and applying the lessons learned to current exercises and curricula can help game design educators develop a more comprehensive experience for their students.

Discussants
avatar for Kurt Squire

Kurt Squire

Co-Director, Games+Learning+Society Center
Kurt Squire is a Professor of Digital Media in the Department of Curriculum & Instruction, and Co-Director of the Games+Learning+Society Center in the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery. Squire is the author or editor of three books, and over 75 scholarly publications on learning with technology. Squire has directed several game-based learning projects, ranging from ARIS, a tool for place-based mobile app development, to ProgenitorX, a game... Read More →

Speakers
RL

Rebecca Ly

Sydney, NSW, Australia, University of Sydney
EN

Eric Nunez

Poughkeepsie, New York, USA, Marist College


Friday August 19, 2016 11:30am - 12:30pm
Agriculture Union South

11:30am

SCIENCE
Designing Scientific Argumentation into the Mission HydroSci
Griffin, Kim, Sigoloff , Sadler, Laffey, Babiuch, Speck

This paper provides an introduction to the argumentation system being developed as part of the Mission HydroSci (MHS) learning game. We will report results from the early stages of development over three iterative phases of design work. The results of these phases suggest progress toward richer argumentation scenarios, which support scientific learning and the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). We will describe how the system supports richer argumentation interactions in three specific ways: 1) dynamic evidence collected by the player in problem-based simulation experiences, 2) complex argument generation, and 3) an intelligent assessment system, which allows for specific player feedback. We will discuss our design progression and how these game mechanics evolved as well as provide implications for supporting argumentation development in learning games.

Implementing Evolution in Video Games
Robison, Soule, Mirabzadeh, Streett, Wood

Instruction of evolutionary biology at the state and national K-12 level is fraught with challenges. We are therefore developing video games that feature explicit models of biological evolution. Our premise is that adding biological evolution to video games makes the games better for the game player and facilitates player comprehension of complex concepts that are hard to teach. By integrating principles of evolutionary biology, we argue that video games can be made more compelling. In this paper, we describe two simple video games in which generations of enemies undergo adaptation through natural selection. The enemies with the traits that best counter the player’s strategies survive to reproduce, and their offspring feature prominently in the next generation (analogous to a game level or wave). In both cases, we demonstrate significant phenotypic evolution of enemy populations over time scales that are amenable to game play.

An Astronomy Education Game for Facebook: Learning From Those Games You Love to Hate
Harold, Haley-Goldman & Hines

With support from NSF and NASA, we have developed a stellar and planetary evolution game for Facebook. The game uses the “sporadic play” model of games such as Farmville, where players may only take actions a few times a day, but may continue playing for months. This framework is an excellent fit for teaching about the evolution of stars and planets: systems evolve in scaled real time (a million years to the minute), so that massive stars supernova within minutes, while stars like our sun live for weeks. The game has now been live for over a year, and has attracted over 20,000 players. Using a mix of data and evaluation strategies, we discuss play duration and retention; player demographics; and content gains. We close with a summary of our current opinions on the perils and promise of developing educational games using this platform and game framework.

Discussants
avatar for Judy Perry

Judy Perry

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Judy currently oversees design, development and research for several projects involving games and simulations for mobile devices, including smartphones and tablets. Her research interests include location-based games and ubiquitous “casual” games. When she is not making or playing mobile games, Judy also leads professional development workshops for educators who want to implement location-based and other games in both formal and informal... Read More →

Speakers
JG

Joseph Griffin

University of Missouri
KH

Kate Haley-Goldman

Haley Goldman Consulting
JH

James Harold

Space Science Institute
DH

Dean Hines

Space Science Institute/Space Telescope Science Institute
avatar for So Mi Kim

So Mi Kim

Columbia, Missouri, United States of America, University of Missouri
avatar for james  laffey

james laffey

Columbia, Missouri, United States of America, University of Missouri
CM

Christopher Mirabzadeh

University of Idaho
BR

Barrie Robison

University of Idaho
TS

Troy Sadler

Columbia, Missouri, United States of America, University of Missouri
JS

Justin Sigoloff

Columbia, Missouri, United States of America, University of Missouri
TS

Terence Soule

University of Idaho
DS

David Streett

University of Idaho
NW

Nicholas Wood

University of Idaho


Friday August 19, 2016 11:30am - 12:30pm
Fifth Quarter Studio Union South

11:30am

Mechanically Embracing the Peasantry: Developing World and Narrative through Mechanical Interactions
Critically acclaimed “The Witcher 3: The Wild Hunt” has been lauded as game of the year, best narrative, best drama, best RPG, best technical achievement, and many more claiming over 70 awards from major conferences and review sites worldwide. This presentation serves to extract, observe, and explain how one specific mechanical shift in “The Witcher 3” helps construct a cohesive, varied, and vibrant experience for the player through analysis of primary versus secondary interactions. As “The Witcher 3” has an enormous amount of available content for discussion, this presentation chooses to analyze closely one specific, mechanical shift.

Speakers
SF

Steven Farrell

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison


Friday August 19, 2016 11:30am - 12:30pm
Marquee Union South

11:30am

Twine Game Jam
This workshop will teach participants how to use Twine (twinery.org), a platform for making text-based games. Twine is an accessible game design platform that mostly relies upon plain written text, with a few programming constructs for more advanced features. In this workshop, participants will be given a brief introduction to the tool and how to use it, then will be free to work in teams or alone to create a short game and publish it to the web. At the end of the session, participants will play each others’ games, then as a group we will discuss thoughts about the tool and implications for learning with it.

Speakers
avatar for Earl  Aguilera

Earl Aguilera

Graduate Research Assistant, Center for Games and Impact, ASU
literacy development in a digital age | the distributed nature of teaching and learning | game experiences as literacy events | re-designing schools for the 21st century | teacher education | high school teaching stories | coffee nerdery of all sorts | dungeons | dragons
avatar for Mark Chen

Mark Chen

Accidental Hero and Layabout, Independent
non-tenure track positions. | life after a PhD. | gaming culture and power/agency in gaming practice. | esoteric gaming practices, workarounds, and hacks. | subversion, representation, margins. | board games.
avatar for Kelly Tran

Kelly Tran

Tempe, Arizona, USA, Arizona State University
PhD Student at Arizona State University.


Friday August 19, 2016 11:30am - 12:30pm
Industry Union South

12:30pm

Lunch
Vegetarian and Gluten free options will be available

Friday August 19, 2016 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Pavillion

1:30pm

Madison Games Alliance Plenary Round Table

Great games require a healthy ecosystem that spans not only researchers, designers and players but also universities, companies, and markets. Within this ecosystem, the health of various nodes in the network are coupled, with the strength of stakeholders in one area contingent on the success of stakeholders in others. At the state by state level, entities such as higher education programs are bound up with local game studios, with a 0.90 correlation between the two (HEVGA, 2015). Although we often cross institutional silos on the individual day-to-day level, with many of us spending half our day on campus and the other half at local studios or cooperative workspaces, it is often only rarely that we organize as groups and organizations to catalyze and improve the ecosystem overall. 

In this plenary panel session, we discuss the local game ecosystem in Madison as way to highlight grassroot efforts to organize and catalyze a healthy ecosystem across business, philanthropy, university, and markets. In this session, local leaders discuss their work through the Madison Games Alliance over the last year to create a local network of game studios, independent developers, faculty, investors, and regional economic economic development agencies with the shared mission of promoting one region (here, the Madison area) as a premier site for game development and design. Local leaders discuss their goals for the local games scene, the barriers and frictions to working across silos, and their working solutions to creating a viable collaborative across nodes. Topics include strategies fro business creation and growth, attracting quality talent, and preparing students for 21st century creative tech industry.


Discussants
avatar for Constance  Steinkuehler

Constance Steinkuehler

Chair, Games+Learning+Society Conference
Constance Steinkuehler is a Professor in Digital Media at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, Co-Director of the Games+Learning+Society (GLS) center at the Wisconsin Institute of Discovery, and Chair of their annual GLS Conference. She currently serves as President of the Higher Education Videogames Alliance (HEVGA), an organization of higher education leaders whose mission is to underscore the cultural, scientific, and economic... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Michael Gay

Michael Gay

Sr. VP of Economic Development, Madison Region Economic Partnership (MadREP)
Michael P. Gay, CEcD, is the Sr. VP of Economic Development for Madison Region Economic Partnership (MadREP) and manages the 8- county economic development programming and staff while serving as the primary regional contact for prospective companies considering relocating to the Madison Region. The MadREP ED Programming includes business attraction, retention and expansion, innovation and entrepreneurship, small business development, industry... Read More →
avatar for Tim Gerritsen

Tim Gerritsen

Director of Business Development, Human Head Studios
I've been an entrepreneur and game designer my entire life, starting my first business while in college designing table top games before moving on to my first break into the video games industry in 1992. My passion remains game development, be it for computer, video game console or table top. I strive daily to evolve both creative development and business models in which games are delivered in this fast moving industry.
avatar for Jennifer Javornik

Jennifer Javornik

Executive Director, Madison Games Alliance
Jennifer Javornik is a seasoned executive who specializes in new business development, partnership management, revenue growth, and operational efficiency. She is currently the Vice President of Sales for Filament Games where she works with companies, organizations, and individuals to explore how they can increase efficacy and engagement in learning through digital learning games. During her tenure so far, she has expanded Filament's reach... Read More →
avatar for Kurt Squire

Kurt Squire

Co-Director, Games+Learning+Society Center
Kurt Squire is a Professor of Digital Media in the Department of Curriculum & Instruction, and Co-Director of the Games+Learning+Society Center in the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery. Squire is the author or editor of three books, and over 75 scholarly publications on learning with technology. Squire has directed several game-based learning projects, ranging from ARIS, a tool for place-based mobile app development, to ProgenitorX, a game... Read More →
avatar for Forrest Woolworth

Forrest Woolworth

COO, PerBlue
Forrest has been a champion of all things entrepreneurial in Madison and a leader in our startup community. A maker of video games and beer, he is COO of PerBlue, a mobile gaming startup company started from a college apartment that now employs 40 people and entertain millions around the world. Forrest is also the Co-Founder and Director of Capital Entrepreneurs, is on the organizing committee for the Forward Festival, and is a founding member of... Read More →


Friday August 19, 2016 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Marquee Union South

2:30pm

Beer & Brats
Friday August 19, 2016 2:30pm - 4:30pm
The Sett

2:30pm

Board Game Bonanza!
We are bringing in over 2,000 board game titles from the vaunted GenCon board game library to end GLS12 with a bang! Come to the Industry or Agriculture rooms (next to the Beer & Brats on the Pavilion) to browse the most amazing collection of board games you've ever seen. Don't miss this opportunity to play one last game with old friends before leaving GLS!

Learn more about the library at https://www.facebook.com/boardgameslibrary/?fref=ts 

Exhibitors


Friday August 19, 2016 2:30pm - 9:00pm
Industry Union South